78Man Podcast Number 11-The 1910s

The 11th 78Man Podcast showcases music from the 1910s. It is available on itunes HERE or on Soundcloud Here. Tracks heard on the Podcast are :

  1. I’m 21 Today by Jack Pleasants (Released by The Winner (2089) in 1912) Jack Pleasants was born in Bradford in 1874 and was a music hall star of the early 20th century, billed as “The Bashful Limit”. His other recordings include “Where do the flies go in Winter”, “Feeding the ducks on the pond”, “Watching the trains come in”, and “I deserve a good slapping”. He died in 1924.
  2. Always Jolly by Billy Whitlock (Released by Beka-Grand Record (203) in 1912) Billy Whilock was born Frederick Penna in 1874, in Cheltenham. He began his recording career in the early 1910s, and continued recording into the 1940s. Other recordings include “Chuckles” (1915),”Billy Whitlock’s Aeroplane” (1926), and “Scotch Hot” (1949). Whilock was, like Charles Penrose, a singer of “laughing” songs and he teamed up with Penrose for some recordings, including “The Yuletide Coach” (1925) and “Two old sports” (1920). Whitlock died in 1951.
  3. Squeeze her Ebeneezer by Billy Williams (Released by Zonophone (1012) in 1913) Billy Williams was born Richard Banks in Australia in 1878, but moved to the UK in 1899, becoming an entertainer and changing his name to Billy Williams. He made his first recordings in 1906 and over the next 9 years became a huge star and prolific recording artiste, making over 500 recordings. He died in March 1915 aged 37. Among his most famous records are “When Father papered the parlour”, “Little Willie’s Woodbines” and “John go and put your trousers on”.
  4. The Wibbly Wobbly Walk by Fred Elliott (Released by Scala (305) in 1913) Fred Elliott was actually a pseudonym for Jack Charman (see below). Other recordings under this name include “Hush! Here comes the dream man” and “You taught me how to love you”.
  5. Cohen on telephone deportment by Joe Hayman (Released in 1913) Joe Hayman was born Joseph Hyman in the US in 1876, and for a while partnered with a young Harry Houdini. After they split, Hyman added an a to his surname and shortened his first name to become Joe Hayman, and moved to the UK where he recorded “Cohen on the telephone” in 1913 for Regal Records. In the US it was released by Columbia and became the first record to sell a million copies. This success inevitably led to the recording of several sequels, including “Cohen calls his tailor on the phone” (1918), “Cohen ‘phones for a phone” (1923), and “Cohen phones the gas co.”. Hayman died in 1957.
  6. Hello, hello, who’s your lady friend by Jack Charman (Released by Coliseum (662) in 1914). Jack Charman was actively recording from around 1911-1924 and his other recordings include “He played on his fiddle-dee-dee”, “Hello old whats-a-name”, “Father went down to Southend”, and “Who were you with last night?”.
  7. Take me back to dear old Blighty by Florrie Forde (Released by Zonophone (1725) in 1916. For more information on Florrie Forde see blog for Podcast number 1 (March 2016).
  8. I had no mother to guide me by George Formby (Senior) (Released by Zonophone (1831) in 1917. For more information on George Formby Senior see blog for Podcast number 8 (September 2016).
  9. Sensation Rag by Original Dixieland Jazz Band.(Released by U.S. Victor 18483, 1918). The Original Dixieland Jass Band (as they were originally known) formed in 1916 and made their first recordings in 1917, when “Livery stable blues” became the first ever jazz record. Over the next few years the band made many recordings and were so successful they spawned a boom in jazz music. Other recordings include “Tiger Rag” (probably their best known record), “Skeleton Jangle”, “At the Jazz band ball”, and “I’m forever blowing bubbles”. The band broke up in the late ’20s but reformed in 1936 and carried on with varying line ups during the ’40s and ’50s.