78Man Podcast Number 17-Around The World Part 1

This Podcast is the first of a two part trip around the world, and can be heard for free on Itunes HERE and on Soundcloud HERE Tracks heard on the Podcast are :

  1. Hong Kong Blues by Hoagy Carmichael (Originally released by Brunswick (03572) in 1947) For more info on Hoagy Carmichael see Episode 5 blog here .You can see Hoagy Carmichael singing the song in the film “To have and have not” here
  2. Esbjfrgvalsen by Alex Og Richards Sang Voldemar David
  3. I’m A Froggie by George Formby (Originally released by Regal Zonophone (MR 2270) in 1936. More info on George Formby can be found in the blog for Podcast 8 here and you can see George in France here
  4. Hver Dag Du Skaenker Mig (Someday My Prince Will Come) by Teddy Petersen og hans Orkester Refrain Annie Jessen. Teddy Petersen was a Danish bandleader born in 1892. In a long career he made over 1000 records and appeared in or recorded music for, many films. He died at the age of 99 in 1991. Annie Jessen was also Danish, and was born in 1915 and became an actress, recording the Danish vocals for the film “Snow White and the Seven dwarfs”, from which this recording comes. She died in 1993.
  5.  Makin’ Wicky Wacky Down In Waikiki by Sophie Tucker (Released by Broadcast Super Twelve (3001) in 1931.) Sophie Tucker was born in 1887, to a Ukrainian family who then moved to the USA and opened a restaurant in Hartford, Connecticut, where her singing career began. She moved to New York and began appearing on stage in Vaudeville, gradually making a name for herself. She began making records in the late 1920s, and her big hits included “My Yiddishe Momme”, “I’m feathering a nest” and “Some of theses days”. She died in 1966. You can see a ten minute video resume of her career here
  6. Toraji by Sugawara Tsuzuko
  7. Alabammy Bound by Les Paul and Mary Ford (Released by Capitol (CL 14502) in 1955). Les Paul was born as Lester William Polsfuss in Wisconsin, USA in 1915 and began his musical career while still a child-at 8 he learnt to play the harmonica before moving on to guitar (later inventing a harmonica holder which enabled him to play guitar and harmonica simultaneously). By the age of 13 he was working semi-professionally and at 17 dropped out of school to work full time as a musician.In the early thirties he was appearing regularly on radio and made his first record in 1936 under the name Rhubarb Red, shortly before adopting the name Les Paul. In the ensuing years he worked with stars such as Nat “King” Cole and Bing Crosby, while also designing and making his own electric guitar and experimenting with different sounds. His innovative guitar playing influenced many later guitar players. In the mid ’40s he built his own recording studio and began experimenting with multi track recording and over-dubbing, techniques hitherto largely unheard of in recording. It was at this time that Les Paul met and married Mary Ford (born Iris Summers in 1924) and they began recording together as a duo, scoring many hits during the first half of the 1950s, also having their own TV show. The marriage lasted until 1964. Mary Ford died in 1977, and Les Paul in 2009.
  8. L’anima Scanca by Guido Volpi
  9.  The Turkish Bath Attendant by Jack Warner (Released by Columbia (FB.3443) in 1942) Jack Warner was born in London in 1895. After serving in the First World War, he worked in the motor trade, and got involved in amateur dramatics in his spare time, only becoming a professional entertainer in his thirties. During the 1930s he became one of the UK’s biggest radio stars, then moved to films in the 1940s, appearing in such films as “The Captive heart”, “Hue and Cry”, “Train of events” and “The Blue Lamp”. In the latter film he played policeman George Dixon”, a role he reprised for Television in “Dixon of Dock Green” which ran from 1955 to 1976. He died in 1981.
  10.  Isle of Capri by Don Porto’s Novelty Accordion Band (Released by Eclipse (784) in 1934. Don Porto was a pseudonym of Harry Bidgood (for more info see entry for Primo Scala in blog for podcast 3 here
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