78Man Podcast Number 24-Film Music 2

The 24th 78Man Podcast is a second selection of music and songs used in films. It can be heard on Itunes Here and on Soundcloud Here . Tracks featured on the podcast are :

 

  1. Dreaming by Flanagan and Allen (Released by Decca (F. 5802) in 1945). (From the 1944 film “Dreaming”). Flanagan and Allen comprised Bud Flanagan (1896-1968), and Chesney Allen (1893-1982). They were both solo stage performers until paired together in 1926 in a Florrie Forde stage show, their career really taking off when they were booked to play the Holborn Empire by Val Parnell in 1929. Their fame grew over the next few years and in 1932 they signed to the Columbia label, releasing such records as “Do you recall”, “Oi!”, “Home Town” and “Down and out blues” over the next 7 years. In 1939 they moved to the Decca label and achieved even greater success with records such as “Run Rabbit Run”, (with its flip side “(We’re Gonna Hang Out) The Washing On The Siegfried Line”), “If A Grey Haired Lady Says How’s Your Father”, “Down Forget Me Not Lane” and “Underneath The Arches”. During this time they also appeared in several films, including “A Fire Has Been Arranged” (1934), “Underneath The Arches” (1937), “Gasbags” (1940) “We’ll Smile Again” (1942), “Theatre Royal” (1943) and “Here Comes The Sun” (1946). The pair were also part of The Crazy Gang, a group of six performers who appeared on stage and in films. Chesney Allen appeared less frequently with them after 1945 due to ill health and retired towards the end of the ’50s. Bud Flanagan carried on working until his death in 1968, ther last thing he recorded being the theme tune to the TV Series “Dad’s Army”, still popular to this day. Chesney Allen died in 1982. The Film “Dreaming” was directed by John Baxter, and as well as Flanagan and Allen, starred Hazel Court, Dick Francis and Philip Wade.
  2. I’ll String Along With You by Phyllis Robins (Released by Rex Records (8319) in 1934). (From the film “Twenty Million Sweethearts”.) Phyllis Robins was born in Sheffield (UK) in 1910. She became a singer and actress, her other records including “Little Man, You’ve Had A Busy Day”, “My Kid’s A Crooner (Boo-Boo-Boo-Boo)”, “His Majesty The Baby” and “Crash! Bang! (The Blackout Song)” and her films including “Murder at the Cabaret” (1936), “Cavalcade of Variety” (1940), “Gaiety George” (1946), and “They made me a fugitive” (1947). She died in 1982. “Twenty Million Sweethearts” was directed by Ray Enright and starred Dick Powell, Ginger Rogers, Pat O’Brien, and Allen Jenkins.
  3. Broadway Rhythm by Carroll Gibbons and The Savoy Hotel Orpheans (Released by Columbia (FB 1202) in 1936.) (From the film “Broadway Melody of 1936). Carroll Gibbons was born in Clinton, Massachusetts, US, in 1903, but became popular as a musician and bandleader in the UK, having studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He became the leader of the Savoy Hotel Orpheans in 1932 and remained so until his death in 1954. He recorded many records for Columbia with the Orpheans, including “On The Air” (1932), “Cocktails For Two” (1934), “These Foolish Things” (1936), “A Foggy Day” (1937), “Begin The Beguine” (1939), “I’m Gonna Get Lit Up” (1943) and “I’ll Remember April” (1945). Gibbons also appeared in several films, including “I Adore You” (1933), “Call me Mame” (1933), “Hello, Sweetheart” (1935), and “The Common Touch” (1941). “Broadway Melody of 1936” was directed by Roy Del Ruth and starred Jack Benny, Eleanor Powell, Robert Taylor and Una Merkel.
  4. I Could Have Danced All Night by Jeannie Carson (Released by Columbia (DB 4125) in 1958). (From the film “My Fair Lady”). Jeannie Carson was born in May 1928 in Yorkshire (with the rather splendid birth name of Jean Shufflebottom), and is one of the rare people featured on the 78Man podcasts who are still with us, living with her husband of 57 years in Los Angeles. She made her film debut in 1948, in “A Date With A Dream”, but her career really took off when she appeared in the stage musical “Love For Judy” in London in 1952. This led to her being offered TV work in the US-she appeared in the TV movie “Best Foot Forward” in 1954, and hosted her own TV Series “Hey, Jeannie!” in 1956. Over the next decade or so she worked in both the US and UK, before settling in America with second husband Biff McGuire, appearing in Seattle Repertory for 15 years. “My Fair Lady” was directed by George Cukor and starred Audrey Hepburn, Rex Harrison, Stanley Holloway and Gladys Cooper. Jeannie Carson had a fleeting uncredited appearance in the film.
  5. Sleepy Head by Chick Bullock (Released by Rex Records (8281) in 1934). (From the film “Spy 13”) Chick Bullock was born in Montana, USA in 1898, and began his career in vaudeville before becoming a successful recording artiste in the early ’30s. His other records include “I’m in the market for you” (1930), “Let me sing and I’m happy” (1930), “The Night When Love Was Born” (1932), “Learn to croon” (1933), “She’s A Latin From Manhattan” (1935), “The Music Goes ‘Round And Around” (1936), “Stairway To The Stars” (1939), and “Amapola (Pretty Little Poppy)” (1941). His recording career petered out in the early ’40s and he retired from music, becoming involved in real estate. He died in 1981. “Spy 13” (also known as “Operator 13”) was directed by Richard Boleslawski, and starred Marion Davies, Gary Cooper and Jean Parker.
  6. I’ve Got You Under My Skin by Leslie Hutchinson (Released by Parlophone (F 670) in 1937.) (From the film “Born to dance”). Leslie Hutchinson was born in Grenada in 1900. As a child he took piano lessons, before moving to New York at the age of 16, initially to study medicine, but instead joined a band led by Henry “Broadway” Jones and began playing live. In 1924 he moved to Paris and then to the UK in 1927, where he became a huge star. Over the next two decades he made many records for the Parlophone and His Master’s Voice labels, including “Little Man You’ve Had A Busy Day” (1934), “Red Sails In The Sunset” (1935), “These Foolish Things” (1936), “Life Is Nothing Without Music” (1939), “Someone’s Rockin’ My Dreamboat” (1942), and “You Always Hurt The One You Love” (1946). He died in London in 1969. “Born To Dance” was directed by Roy Del Ruth and starred Eleanor Powell, James Stewart and Virginia Bruce.
  7. The ‘Amstead Way by Tessie O’Shea (Released by Columbia (DB 2232) in 1947 (From the film “London Town”). Tessie O’Shea was born in 1913 in Cardiff, Wales. She began performing as a child and by her teens was a regular on BBC Radio. During the 1930s she adopted “Two Ton Tessie From Tennessee” as her theme song, a reference to her larger size. She recorded the song for Parlophone in 1943, and her other records include “Wish me luck-Kiss me goodbye” (1938), “Oh! Oh! Oh! Oh! Oh! Oh! What A Silly Place To Kiss A Girl” (1938) and “He Said “Kiss Me”” (1939). As time went by Tessie moved from singing to acting and her film appearances include “Holidays with pay” (1948), “The Shiralee” (1957), “The Russians Are Coming! The Russians Are Coming!” (1966), “The Best House In London” (1969) and “Bedknobs And Broomsticks” (1971). “London Town” was directed by Wesley Ruggles, and, alongside Tessie, starred Sid Field, Petula Clark, Greta Gynt and Kay Kendall.
  8. Just You Just Me by Jack Hylton and His Band (Released by His Master’s Voice (B 5759) in 1929). (From the film “Marianne”). Jack Hylton was born in July 1892 in Bolton, UK. His Father was an amateur singer, and Jack learnt to play piano to accompany him. Later, Jack started singing himself, in his Father’s pub. In 1922 he released his first records under the name Jack Hylton’s Jazz Band for the Zonophone label, then the following year he moved to His Master’s Voice, where he released dozens of records until 1931, as Jack Hylton and his Orchestra, including “It ain’t gonna rain no mo’” (1924), “Chick, Chick, Chicken” (1925), “Ain’t She Sweet” (1927), “Forty-Seven ginger headed sailors” (1928) and “Mucking about the garden” (1929). In 1931 he moved to Decca Records, where he was a director, where he stayed until 1934, when he re-signed to His Master’s Voice. He continued recording until 1940, and after the war became an impresario, managing new talent and producing theatre, radio and film productions before forming his own TV production company. His TV production credits include “Summer’s Here” (1957), “The Music Box” (1957), “Before Your Very Eyes” (1957/8), “Jack Hylton’s Monday Show” (1958) and “Tell It To The Marines” (1959/60). He died in January 1965. “Marianne” was directed by Robert Z Leonard, and starred Marion Davies, Oscar Shaw and Fred Solm.
  9. Singin’ In The Bathtub by Alfredo And His Band (Released by Edison Bell Radio (1331) in 1930). (From the film “Show Of Shows”). Alfredo was Alfred Gill, born circa 1892. He began his career as Alfredo, the Vagabond Violinist, before forming his band and recording many records, mainly for the Edison Bell Radio label. These include “My Blue Heaven” (1928), “I’m Thirsty For Kisses, Hungry For Love”, “Mean To Me”, “My Song Of The Nile” (all 1929), “Now I’m In Love”, “Molly”, “King Of Jazz”, and “Cheer Up And Smile ” (all 1930). He split the group in 1930, and apart from a few more records for HMV under the name Alfredo and his Orchestra, didn’t record again. He died in 1966. “Show of shows” was directed by John G Adolphi, and starred Frank Fay, William Courtenay, H B Warner and Hobart Bosworth.
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