3 New CD Releases!

Three more 78Man Digital albums have been made available on CD. They can be bought on Discogs via the 78Man Store Here or on Ebay from seller Decal23. Alternatively contact me via here, Facebook or Twitter if you don’t use Discogs or Ebay.

The albums are :

78Man Favourites Vol 4

  1. The Music Goes Round and Around-Eddy-Reilly And Their Onyx Club Boys (Brunswick RL 325, 1935)
  2. Mary Ellen’s Hotpot Party-Gracie Fields (Regal Zonophone MR 2067, 1936)
  3. Blaydon Races-The Five Smith Brothers (Parlophone F 2342, 1949)
  4. Everything Is Fresh Today-Jack Hodges (Regal Zonophone MR 1046, 1933)
  5. Feeling My Way-Eddie Lang (Parlophone R 2565, 1938)
  6. Sh’ Shiverin’-Leonard Henry (His Master’s Voice B 2883, 1929)
  7. Ole Faithful-The Three Gynx (Rex 8328, 1934)
  8. Hello Twins-Randolph Sutton (Imperial 2658, 1932)
  9. Shinanika Da-Henry Hearty (Zonophone 5302, 1929)
  10. Hunting Tigers out in Indiah-Walter Miller With Harry Hudson’s Melody Men ( Edison Bell Radio 1421, 1930)
  11. I’ll Bet You Tell That to All the Girls-Billy Cotton And His Band (Regal Zonophone MR 2170, 1936)
  12. The Warber’s Serenade (A Musical Travesty)-The London Novelty Orchestra (Regal Zonophone MR 95, 1932)
  13. Peter’s Pop Keeps a Lollipop Shop-Jack Payne And His Band (Rex 8886, 1936)
  14. My Wife Is On a Diet-Jack Kaufman (Imperial 2178, 1929)
  15. Narcissus-Joyce Grenfell And Norman Wisdom (Columbia DB 3161, 1952)
  16. The Druid’s Prayer-The International Novelty Orchestra (Regal Zonophone MR 1116, 1934)
  17. Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf-BBC Dance Orchestra (Columbia CB 669, 1933)
  18. Buy British-Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 6103, 1932)
  19. My Last Year’s Girl-Leslie Holmes (Rex Records 8135, 1934)
  20. Tiptoe Through the Tulips-Jack Hylton And His Orchestra (His Master’s Voice B 5722, 1929)

78Man Presents Leslie Sarony Vol. 5

1. Coom, Pretty One (Rex 8183, 1934)
2. I Laughed So Hard I Nearly Died (Eclipse 346, 1933)
3. Hold Out Your Pudding for Jam (Eclipse 346, 1933)
4. The Old Sow (Rex 8145, 1934)
5. Jollity Farm (With Jack Hylton & His Orchestra, HMV B5744, 1930)
6. He Played His Ukulele As the Ship Went Down, Pt. 1 (Eclipse 175, 1932)
7. He Played His Ukulele As the Ship Went Down, Pt. 2 (Eclipse 175, 1932)
8. Sing Holly! Go Whistle! Hey Hey! (Broadcast Super Twelve 3026, 1931)
9. Years and Years and Years (Eclipse 871, 1934)
10.No! No! A Thousand Times No! (Eclipse 871, 1934)
11.Sarah Jane (Imperial 2108, 1929)
12.Make Up Your Mind You’re Gonna Be Young (Imperial 2399, 1930)
13.Sunny Days (Imperial 2399, 1930)
14.I Taught Her How to Play (Eclipse 849, 1934)
15.Tom Thumb’s Drum (With Jack Hylton and His Orchestra, Decca F. 2672, 1931)
16.What Are You Going to Do About Mary (Imperial 2121, 1929)
17.On Ilkla Moor Baht’At (Rex 8145, 1934)
18.Virginia (There’s a Blue Ridge Round My Heart) (The Victory 56, 1928)
19.More Rhymes, Pt. 3 (Eclipse 164, 1932)
20.More Rhymes, Pt. 4 (Eclipse 164, 1932)

Songs That Leslie Sarony Taught Us Vol. 2

  1. Why Build A Wall Round A Graveyard?-Roy Fox and His Band (Decca F. 3762, 1933)
  2. I’m a Little Prairie Flower-Jack Jackson & His Band (Decca F. 6652, 1937)
  3. Mucking About the Garden-Jack Morrison (Broadcast 453, 1929)
  4. Madonna Mine-Billy Reid And His London Piano Accordion Band (Decca F. 5116, 1935)
  5. Once Aboard the Lugger-Jack Hylton & His Orchestra (Decca F. 2795, 1932)
  6. When the Band Goes Marching By-Jack Grose And His Metropole Players (Eclipse 265, 1932)
  7. Bunkey Doodle I Doh-Albert Whelan (The Victory 182, 1929)
  8. Ain’t Love Grand-Joe Loss And His Band (Regal Zonophone MR 2645, 1937)
  9. Rhymes, Pt. 1 and 2-Orpheus Dance Band (Zonophone 6016, 1932)
  10. More Rhymes, Pt. 1 and 2-George Buck And The Roysterers (Edison Bell Winner 5441, 1932)
  11. When the Guards Are on Parade-Arcadians Dance Orchestra (Zonophone 5937, 1931)
  12. Ain’t It Grand to Be Bloomin’ Well Dead-Primo Scala’s Accordian Band (Decca F. 9011, 1948)
  13. Snap Your Fingers, Clap Your Hands-Billy Cotton & His Band (Regal MR 583, 1932)
  14. Wheezy Anna-The Barmy Brothers (Regal Zonophone MR 830, 1933)
  15. Over the Garden Wall-Jack Payne & His BBC Dance Orchestra (Columbia CB 132, 1930)
  16. I Lift Up My Finger and I Say “Tweet Tweet”-Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5342, 1929)
  17. Jollity Farm-Jack Payne & His BBC Dance Orchestra (Columbia 5729, 1930)
  18. Forty Seven Ginger Headed Sailors-Tommy Handley (Piccadilly 140, 1928)
  19. Clonkerty Clonk-Jack Hylton & His Orchestra (His Master’s Voice B 5321, 1927)
  20. Tom Thumb’s Drum-Tommy Kinsman And His Ciros Club Band (Sterno 845, 1932)
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More New Releases !

There have been several new releases available for download/streaming  in the last few months, these are : “Songs that Leslie Sarony Taught us Vol 2”, “The Bert Layton Recordings Vol 1” by Leslie Sarony, “78Man Favourites Vol 6”, “Charles Penrose Vol 2”, “Novelty songs of the ’20s and ’30s”, and “Durium Dance Band”. Track listings for each release are below. (For copyright reasons these releases are not available in the USA).

Songs That Leslie Sarony Taught Us Vol 2

(A second collection of cover versions of songs written or co-written by Leslie Sarony)

  1. Why Build A Wall Round A Graveyard?-Roy Fox and His Band (Decca F. 3762, 1933)
  2. I’m a Little Prairie Flower-Jack Jackson & His Band (Decca F. 6652, 1937)
  3. Mucking About the Garden-Jack Morrison (Broadcast 453, 1929)
  4. Madonna Mine-Billy Reid And His London Piano Accordion Band (Decca F. 5116, 1935)
  5. Once Aboard the Lugger-Jack Hylton & His Orchestra (Decca F. 2795, 1932)
  6. When the Band Goes Marching By-Jack Grose And His Metropole Players (Eclipse 265, 1932)
  7. Bunkey Doodle I Doh-Albert Whelan (The Victory 182, 1929)
  8. Ain’t Love Grand-Joe Loss And His Band (Regal Zonophone MR 2645, 1937)
  9. Rhymes, Pt. 1 and 2-Orpheus Dance Band (Zonophone 6016, 1932)
  10. More Rhymes, Pt. 1 and 2-George Buck And The Roysterers (Edison Bell Winner 5441, 1932)
  11. When the Guards Are on Parade-Arcadians Dance Orchestra (Zonophone 5937, 1931)
  12. Ain’t It Grand to Be Bloomin’ Well Dead-Primo Scala’s Accordian Band (Decca F. 9011, 1948)
  13. Snap Your Fingers, Clap Your Hands-Billy Cotton & His Band (Regal MR 583, 1932)
  14. Wheezy Anna-The Barmy Brothers (Regal Zonophone MR 830, 1933)
  15. Over the Garden Wall-Jack Payne & His BBC Dance Orchestra (Columbia CB 132, 1930)
  16. I Lift Up My Finger and I Say “Tweet Tweet”-Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5342, 1929)
  17. Jollity Farm-Jack Payne & His BBC Dance Orchestra (Columbia 5729, 1930)
  18. Forty Seven Ginger Headed Sailors-Tommy Handley (Piccadilly 140, 1928)
  19. Clonkerty Clonk-Jack Hylton & His Orchestra (His Master’s Voice B 5321, 1927)
  20. Tom Thumb’s Drum-Tommy Kinsman And His Ciros Club Band (Sterno 845, 1932)

The Bert Layton Recordings Vol. 1 by Leslie Sarony (EP)

In 1931, Leslie Sarony recorded several records under the name Bert Layton for Woolworths’ Eclipse label. This EP contains four of those recordings.

  1. Lizzie, Come In and Shut That Door (Eclipse 55, 1931)
  2. I’m Happy When I’m Hiking (Eclipse 69, 1931)
  3. We Won’t Go Home Till Morning and Then We Won’t Go Home! (Eclipse 83, 1931)
  4. The Prosperity Song (Eclipse 69, 1931)

78Man Favourites, Vol 6

  1. The Music Goes ‘Round and Around-Hal Kemp And His Orchestra (Regal Zonophone C 22700, 1936)
  2. No! No! A Thousand Times No, Pt. 1 & 2-Fred Douglas & Bertha Willmott (Regal Zonophone MR 1502, 1934
  3. Mickey Mouse’s Birthday Party-Billy Cotton & His Band (Rex Records 8915, 1936)
  4. Sitting on a Five Barr’d Gate-Sharp & Flat (Piccadilly 696, 1931)
  5. Bees Are Buzzin’-Cicely Courtneidge (Columbia DB 2805, 1951)
  6. Put Your Worries Through the Mangle-Randolph Sutton (Edison Bell Radio 1426, 1931)
  7. Misery Farm-North And South (Parlophone R 288, 1928)
  8. Pass the Biscuits, Mirandy-Spike Jones & His City Slickers (His Master’s Voice B.D. 1207, 1948)
  9. Old Soldiers Never Die, Pt. 1 & 2-Gracie Fields (Rex Records 8618, 1935)
  10. Abide with Me-Grand Massed Brass Bands (Regal MR 663, 1932)
  11. Everybody’s Doing It-Tommy Dorsey & His Clambake Seven (His Master’s Voice B 8809, 1938)
  12. Gramophone Yodel-Daimler And Eadie (Eclipse 937, 1935)
  13. Constantinople-The Radio Imps (Imperial 1926, 1928)
  14. Three Little Fishes-Frankie Howerd (Harmony A1001, 1949)
  15. Turn On the Heat-Vincent Howard & His Dance Orchestra (Sterno 260, 1929)
  16. After the Night Before-Sammy Gay (Crown 83, 1935)
  17. At The Old Pig and Whistle-Harry Fay (Regal Zonophone MR 971, 1933)
  18. The ‘Amstead Way-Tessie O’Shea (Columbia DB 2232, 1947)
  19. The Flies Crawled Up the Window-Jack Hulbert (His Master’s Voice B 4263, 1932)
  20. Tip-Toe Thru’ the Tulips with Me-Solemn And Gay (Zonophone 5496, 1930)

78Man Presents Charles Penrose Volume 2

  1. Our Albert’s Accordeon-Charles Penrose & Kaye Connor (Columbia DB 1461, 1934)
  2. Jolly Coppers on Parade-Charles Penrose (Columbia DB 1461, 1934)
  3. The Laughing Scot, Jock McLean Fra’ Aberdeen-Charles Penrose (Piccadilly 230, 1929)
  4. Laugh and Grow Fat Like Me-Fred Arthurs (Columbia 2089, 1913)
  5. Laughing, Love and the Old Trombone-Charles Penrose & Kaye Connor (Columbia DB 266, 1930)
  6. Laughteritis-Charles Penrose (Columbia DB 302, 1930)
  7. He’d a Funny Little Way With Him-Charles Penrose (Winner 2155, 1912)
  8. Laughing Brown of Camden Town-Charlie Happy (Guardsman 2083, 1926)
  9. The Village Laugh-Smith-Charles Penrose (Columbia 4691, 1928)
  10. Laughing Railway Porter-Charles Penrose (Columbia DB 302, 1930)
  11. Laughing Through Part 1 and 2-Charles Penrose (Columbia DB 1010, 1931)
  12. The Laughing Yodeler-B. Gay and O. Joy (Sterno 541, 1929)
  13. The Laughing Wife and the Clarinet-Charles Penrose & Kaye Connor (Columbia DB 266, 1930)
  14. I Tried to Keep From Laughing-Charles Penrose (Winner 2155, 1912)
  15. The Artful Verger-Charles Penrose (Zonophone 1817, 1917)
  16. That Contagious Laugh-Charles Penrose (Zonophone 1817, 1917)
  17. An Irish Courtship-Charles Penrose & Leslie Hope (Regal G 8284, 1924)
  18. The Laughing Crazy Bassoon-The Laughtermongers (Decca F. 2226, 1931)
  19. The Laughing Curate-Fred Arthurs (Columbia 2089, 1913)
  20. The Piccadilly Laughing Band-Charles Penrose (Piccadilly 230, 1929)

78Man Presents Novelty Songs of the ’20s and ’30s

  1. I Laughed So Hard I Nearly Died-Billy Cotton & His Band (Regal Zonophone MR 747, 1932)
  2. Barnacle Bill the Sailor-Bud Billings (Zonophone 5399, 1929)
  3. I’m Popeye the Sailor Man-Harry Leader & His Band (Eclipse 978, 1935)
  4. Why Is the Bacon So Tough?-Leonard Henry (His Master’s Voice B 2883, 1929)
  5. Hunting Tigers Out In India-Jack Payne & His BBC Dance Orchestra (Columbia CB 151, 1930)
  6. Roger the Lodger-The Two Gilberts (Regal MR 198, 1930)
  7. He Played His Ukulele as the Ship Went Down-Fred And Leslie Gilbert (Broadcast Super Twelve 3151, 1932)
  8. The Lunatics Lullaby-Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 2785, 1926)
  9. Make Yourself a Happiness Pie-G H Elliott (Edison Bell Radio 1453, 1931)
  10. The Yodelling Sailor-George Van Dusen (Rex Records 8655, 1935)
  11. There’s a Song They Sing at a Sing Song In Sing Sing-Primo Scala’s Accordian Band (Rex Records 8719, 1936)
  12. Me Too, Ho-Ho! Ha-Ha!-Alfredo’s Band (Edison Bell Winner 4553, 1927)
  13. We All Go Oo Ha Ha! Together-Albert Whelan (Imperial 2404, 1930)
  14. Oh Mum!-Florrie Forde (Imperial 2554, 1931)
  15. Don’t Have Any More Missus Moore-Jack Hay (Imperial 1706, 1927)
  16. Sophie on the Sofa-Sharp & Flat (Piccadilly 628, 1930)
  17. Down In the Field Where the Buttercups All Grow-Charlie Higgins (Rex Records 8065, 1933)
  18. When the Guardsman Started Crooning On Parade-Bobbie Comber (Rex Records 8679, 1935)
  19. Alice’s ‘Ouse-Peter Rush (Imperial 1706, 1927)
  20. With Her Head Tucked Underneath Her Arm, Pt. 1 & 2-Sammy Gay (Eclipse 842, 1934)

78Man Presents Durium Dance Band

(All tracks originally released on Durium Records in 1932/3, as single sided 2 track cardboard records)

  1. Just Humming Along (EN 13)
  2. Let’s All Sing Like the Birdies Sing (EN 42)
  3. Venetian Lady (EN 42)
  4. What Would You Do ? (EN 14)
  5. Gipsy Moon (EN 16)
  6. It Ain’t No Fault of Mine (EN 19)
  7. The Echo of a Song (EN 19)
  8. Lovable (EN 21)
  9. Foolish Over You (EN 21)
  10. Round the Marble Arch (EN 17)
  11. Oi! Song (EN 29)
  12. When Yuba Plays the Rumba On the Tuba (EN 23)
  13. Why Be So Unkind to Me? (EN 30)
  14. We All Wanna Know Why (EN 30)
  15. You Loving Me (EN 43)
  16. After the Ball (EN 7)
  17. My Donna Rita (EN 40)
  18. Sweethearts Forever (EN 38)
  19. By the Sycamore Tree (EN 10)
  20. An Ev’ning in Caroline (EN 10)

78Man Podcast Number 32-Classical Music

From the very beginnings of recorded music being available on 78s, Classical music was being recorded and released. This Podcast looks at some of that music. It can be found on itunes Here and Podbean Here . Tracks featured are :

1. Intermezzo from Mascagni’s “Cavalleria Rusticana” by New Light Symphony Orchestra (Released by His Master’s Voice (B 2377) in 1926). Pietro Mascagni was born in December 1863, in Tuscany, Italy. He began studying music aged 13, and began composing his own works at 16. His first major succes was with the opera “Cavalleria Rusticana” in 1890 and he went on to compose many other operas, including “L’Amico Fritz” (1891), “Silvano” (1895), “Iris” (1898), “Amica” (1905) and “Lodoletta” (1917). He died in August 1945. The New Light Symphony Orchestra made many records for His Master’s Voice, the majority between 1925 and 1934. Others include “Rustic Wedding Symphony” (1925), “In A Clock Store” (1927), “Poet And Peasant-Overture” (1930), “Juba Dance” (1932) and “Glow Worm Idyll” (1934).

2, Narcissus by Joyce Grenfell and Norman Wisdom (Released by Columbia (DB 3161) in 1952). Joyce Phipps was born in February 1910 in London. She married Reginald Grenfell in 1929, so was known as Joyce Grenfell when she made her stage debut in 1939. During the Second World War she toured Italy, North Africa, the Middle East and India, entertaining the troops with her pianist Viola Tunnard. She appeared in a couple of films during the war but it was after the war that her film career took off, appearing in such films as “Alice in Wonderland” (1949), “Stage Fright” (1950), “The Million Pound Note” (1953), “Fobidden Cargo” (1954), and three “St. Trinians” films between 1954 and 1960. As well as her film career, she had a successful recording career and toured extensively, as well as in later years appearing regularly on TV. She died in November 1979. Norman Wisdom was born in February 1915 in London. Born into a poor family, he joined the army at 15, and was sent to India, where he became the flyweight boxing champion of the British army in India, and learned to play trumpet and clarinet. It was while in the army that he developed his stage act, and made his debut as a professional musician in 1946, after he’d left the army. He made his TV debut and made a series of successful films during the ’50s and ’60s, including “Trouble in store” (1953), “One good turn” (1955), “The Square Peg” (1958), “Follow A Star” (1959), “On the beat” (1962), and “The early bird” (1965). The film roles dried up by the late ’60s but in the early ’70s he appeared in three TV series, “Norman”, “Nobody is Norman Wisdom” and “A little bit of Wisdom”. In later years Wisdom appeared sporadically on TV and the occasional film, as well as live appearances. Later TV appearances included “Last of the Summer Wine” and “Coronation Street”. He announced his retirement at 90 in 2005 (although he did make one further short film, “Expresso”). He died aged 95 in October 2010.

3. Rachmaninoff’s 18th Variation on a theme by Paganini by Winifred Atwell (Released by Philips (PB 234) in 1954). (For info on Winifred Atwell see previous blog Here ).

4. In the hall of the mountain King by Edna Hatzfield and Mark Strong (Released by Rex Records (10.050) in 1941). “In the Hall of the Mountain King” is from Grieg’s “Peer Gynt”, the incidental music to the Ibsen play of the same name, composed in 1875. Edvard Grieg was born in June 1843, in Bergen, Norway. His Mother was a music teacher and taught him to play piano as a child. At 15 he enrolled in the Leipzig Cpnservatory where he studied piano, and at 18 made his debut as a concert pianist. A couple of years later he started composing and went on to compose Sonatas and Concertos for piano, violin and cello. He died in September 1907. The Operetta “Song of Norway” (1944) and the 1970 film of the same name tells the story of Grieg’s early years.

5. Chopsticks by Carmen Cavallaro (Released by Bruswick (05577) in 1956). Carmen Cavallaro was born in May 1913 in New York City. He showed promise as a pianist from an early age, picking out tunes on a toy piano at the age of three, and went on to study Classical Piano. In 1933 he joined Al Kavelin’s Orchestra, and went on to play with Rudy Vallee before forming his own band in 1939. He consolidated his success during the ’40s with radio and film appearances, appearing in the films “Diamond Horseshoe”, “Out of this world” (both 1945), and “The time, the place, and the girl” (1946). He died in October 1989.

6. The Flight of The Bumble Bee by Harry James and His Orchestra (Released by Parlophone (R 2848) in 1942). Harry James was born in March 1916 in Albany, Georgia. His father was a bandleader in a circus, while his mother was an acrobat. His father began teaching him trumpet aged 8. By the age of 15, his family had settled in Texas and Harry began playing in local dance bands. He played with various bands, before joing Benny Goodman’s band in 1937, and then formed his own band in 1939, scoring a major hit with “You made me love you” in 1941. During the early days of the band, a young Frank Sinatra sang with them, although he left them after a matter of months. The band also had success in radio and film, and Harry continued playing with them until his death in July 1983.

7. Trusting Eyes by Enrico Caruso (Released by His Master’s Voice (4-2480) in 1914). Enrico Caruso was born in Naples, Italy, on 28th February, 1873. As a child, he sang in the church choir, where his exceptional voice was noted. His Father wanted him to follow in his footsteps and become a mechanical engineer, and he was enrolled as an apprentice at the age of 11, but his Mother (who died when he was 15) encouraged him to carry on singing and he would earn extra money as a street singer and in cafes. He made his first professional singing appearance at the age of 22 in the Opera “L’Amico Francesco”, and several years later, in 1902, made his first recordings for the Gramophone and Typewriter Company. The following year, 1903, he made his debut with the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, and in 1904 signed a lucrative recording contract with the Victor Talking Machine Company. He stayed with Victor for the rest of his life. Over the next decade and a half he sang worldwide, becoming the world’s biggest opera star. Towards the end of World War One he undertook a lot of charity work for the war effort, and in 1918 married Dorothy Park Benjamin. During late 1920 Caruso began to suffer ill health, initially as a result of a pillar falling on him during a performance of Pagliacci at The Met. He was diagnosed with Bronchitis, and in December suffered a throat haemorrage on stage, leading to the cancellation of his performance. During early 1921 he underwent a series of operations as his condition worsened and died on the 21st August, aged 48.

8. Greensleeves by The Beverley Sisters (Released by Decca (F 10853) in 1957). The Beverley Sisters were a UK trio comprising sisters Joy (1924-2015) and twins Teddie and Babs (born 1927) Chinery. They came to prominence after successfully auditioning to sing in an advert for Ovaltine, and then for BBC Radio in 1944. They made many appearances on BBC Radio during the late ’40s an early ’50s, and signed to Columbia Records in 1951, then to Philips in 1953 and finally Decca in 1955. They scored their first UK hit with “I Saw mommy kissing Santa Claus” in 1953 and had several other hits over the following years including “Willie Can” (1956), “I Dreamed” (1957), “Little drummer boy” (1959) and “Green Fields” (1960). The group’s hits dried up in the early ’60s and they rarely recorded after then, although they continued to sing live and appear on TV. As late as 2009 they were still making occasional live appearances, before retiring.

9. The Conclusion to Elgar’s “Pomp and Circumstance March Number 1” by The Royal Festival Hall Orchestra and Choir conducted by Sir Malcolm Sergeant (Released by His Master’s Voice (D.A. 1981) in 1951) The Royal Festival Hall, on the South bank of the river Thames in London, was built as part of the 1951 Festival of Britain. This recording was made at the Ceremonial Opening Concert on May 3rd 1951. Edwatd William Elgar was born in June 1857 in Lower Broadheath, a village just outside Worcester, England. His Father owned a shop selling sheet music and musical instruments, which led to the young Elgar’s interest in music. Although he had piano and violin lessons, Elgar largely self taught himself music theory from books. After leaving school he had a short period as a solicitor’s clerk before devoting his career to music, giving piano and violin lessons, working in his Father’s shop and playing music in live concerts. It was at this point he began composing.His first major succes came in 1899 with The Enigma Variations. Elgar composed five Pomp and Circumstance Marches, the first two in 1901. With words added by A C Benson, the conclusion of March number 1 became better known as “Land of Hope and Glory” and became a mainstay of the last night of the proms. Elgar was knighted in 1904 and although his major works were all composed by around 1910, he continued composing up to his death in February 1934. During the late 1920s after electrical recording became the norm he recorded many of his own compositions for His Master’s Voice, many of which were recorded at the then new Abbey Road Studios in London.