Tag Archives: Albert Whelan

78Man Presents Podcast No. 6 – 78Man Favourites

The Sixth Podcast features some of 78Man’s favourite 78s. It can be found on Itunes HERE or on Soundcloud HERE Songs heard are :

  1. Song of the Emmenthaler Valley by The Alpine Yodelling Choir (Released by Regal  (G 9429) in 1929). Yodelling can be traced back to the 16th century and was originally used in the central Alps by herders calling their stock and to communicate between Alpine villages. It became popular as entertainment in music halls and theatres during the 1830s, and peaked in popularity in the late 1920s after Jimmie Rodgers released “Blue Yodel number 1”. Since then there have been several famous yodellers-Bill Haley began his singing career as a yodeller before switching to Rock ‘n’ Roll, while Hank Snow began his career as “The Yodeling Ranger” before becoming a big country music star. Frank Ifield had a huge hit with “She taught me to yodel” in 1962 and “The Sound of Music”, one of the most successful films of the 1960s featured the yodelling song “The Lonely Goatherd”. Despite all this, “Song of the Emmenthaler Valley” appears to be The Alpine Yodelling Choir’s only record and very little is known about them!
  2. Captain Ginjah by Harry Fay Harry Fay began his recording career in 1909 and made many records over the next two and a half decades, mainly as a solo artist but also duets with Florrie Forde and Stanley Kirkby. Among the well known songs he recorded are “It’s a long way to Tipperary”, “Alexander’s Ragtime Band”, “Yes! We have no bananas”, “Bless ’em all”, “Hello! Here comes a jolly sailor”, “Gilbert the Filbert” and “I Do like an egg for my tea”. He also recorded under several pseudonyms, such as Charles Denton and Fred Vernon.
  3. On Her Doorstep Last Night by The Rhythmic Troubadours (with vocal chorus by Tom Barratt) (Released by Regal (G 9455) in 1929). Tom Barratt was active on the recording front from the mid ’20s to the early ’30s and sang with several bands on record-the Jay Wilbur Orchestra, the Nat Starr Orchestra and the Regent Orchestra among others, as well as recording under the pseudonym of Tom Bailey. The Rhythmic Trobadours other recordings included “Ali Baba’s Camel”, “Kiss me goodnight” and “Great Day”.
  4. All By Yourself in the Moonlight by Randolph Sutton (Released by Edison Bell Radio (895) in 1928) Randolph Sutton was born in 1888 in Bristol, and made his stage debut in 1913. He soon became a popular singer but only began recording in earnest in the late 1920s. His other recordings include “All by yourself in the moonlight”, “Oh! Arthur! (What have you done to Martha?)”, “Is Izzy Azzy Woz?”, “Drivin’ the geese to market” and “The sun has got his hat on (He’s coming out today)”. Sutton was a successful stage performer, appearing in many pantomimes and revues, as well as radio and TV appearances (he appeared on BBC TV’s “The Good old days” in 1954.) He continued working until his death, making his final stage appearance on 26th February 1969 in St. Albans, two days before he died. A month later, Radio 2 produced a tribute programme, introduced by George Martin. His influence was such that further tribute programmes were made by Radio 2 in 1980 and 1982.
  5. Banana Oil by Vaughn De Leath (Released by Columbia (3720) in 1925) Vaughn De Leath was born in 1894 in Illinois,USA, as Leonore Vonderlieth, moving to Los Angeles aged 12. She started singing during the 1910s and made her first radio broadcast in 1920 for New York’s 2XG station. The following year she began her recording career and over the next decade made records for Columbia, Brunswick, Okeh, Edison, Victor and others, both under her own name and using pseudonyms such as Sadie Green, Betty Brown and Gertrude Dwyer. Her recordings as Vaughn  De Leath include “Are you lonesome tonight?”, “Under the moon” and “Looking at the world through rose coloured glasses”.  She continued making radio appearances throughout the ’20s and ’30s but her career waned and she died in 1943, having suffered financial problems and alcohol addiction in later years.
  6. Bunkey-Doodle-I-Doh by Hal Swain and his Band (Released by Regal (G 9440) in 1929). Hal Swain was born on May 9th 1894 in Canada. He learned to play saxophone and formed a band which played in Toronto between 1921 and 1924 and was then offered a job in the UK. The band came over and played at the New Prince’s Restaurant in Piccadilly as The New Prince’s Toronto Band, also gaining a recording contract with Columbia, for whom they made records such as “Chick chick chicken”, “Ukulele Baby”, “Follow the swallow” and “Is Zat So?”. This band lasted until 1926, when Hal Swain left and formed Hal Swain’s New Toronto band and continued playing at the New Prince’s until 1928. During this time the BBC broadcast dozens of appearances by the band direct from the restaurant. He then made a series of records for various labels under the name Hal Swain and his band, including “Riding on a camel”, “Saxophobia”, “My baby just cares for me”, “Goodnight, Sweetheart”, and “Tango Lady”. Hal’s recording career dried up during the ’30s but in the late ’30s he teamed up with The Swing Sisters, three female accordion players, and this team lasted until the early ’50s. He died on September 1st 1966. You can see him in 1939 with The Swing sisters Here
  7. Umpa Umpa (Stick It Up Your Jumper) by The Two Leslies (Released by Regal Zonophone (MR 1920) in 1935.) The Two Leslies comprised Leslie Sarony (See Podcast 1 blog) and Leslie Holmes. Holmes, like Sarony, was a singer of novelty songs (and covered many of Sarony’s compositions) although not as prolific or successful. His solo recordings included “I’ve gone and lost my little Yo-Yo”,”The old kitchen kettle”,”Ask me another”(all 1932),”What do you give a nudist on her birthday?”(1934) and “Winter draws on”(1935). The pair joined forces in 1935 and performed as a duo until 1946. The Two Leslies records included “The New Sow”, “The Campbells are coming”, “I’m a little prairie flower” and “So ‘Andsome”.  The phrase “Oompah oompah Stick it up your jumper” was used subsequently by comedian Jimmy Edwards and in several Carry on films, as well as appearing at the end of The Beatles’ song “I am the walrus”.
  8. Pass! Shoot! Goal! By Albert Whelan (Released by Imperial (2404) in 1930) Albert Whelan was born in Melbourne, Australia on 5 May 1875 and had some success in his homeland before emigrating to the UK. He started his recording career in 1905 and made many recordings right up to 1960, his recordings including “Over the garden wall”, “Barnacle Bill the sailor”, “We all go Oo, Ha ha! Together” and “Come and have a cuddle on the common”. He also made many appearances on BBC Radio from 1928 onwards, and during the 1950s introduced a regular programme on the home service called “Mutual Friends” on which he played records. As well as radio and recording work, he also appeared in many films, including “The Man from Chicago” (1930), “The girl in the Taxi” (1937), “Danny Boy” (1941) and “Candlelight in Algeria” (1944). He died on 19th February 1961.
  9. Sweet and Low by The Century Quartette (Released by Columbia (3278) in 1923). The music for “Sweet and Low” was written by Joseph Barnby with lyrics taken from a poem by Alfred Tennyson, in 1865. Barnby was born in 1838 in York, and became a chorister at the age of 7 before moving on to become an organist and conductor. He died in 1896. Tennyson was born in 1809 in Lincolnshire and after attending Grammar School in Louth began studying at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he published his first poems. He was appointed Poet Laureate in 1850, a position he held up until his death in 1892. “Sweet and Low” was recorded on 78 by many artistes, including The Zonophone Glee Party (1911), Big City Four (1919), Mr. Robert Woodville (1921), and The Cloister Bells (1951)

78Man Podcast No. 9

The Ninth 78Man podcast is slightly different as it is dedicated to my Uncle Jim, who bequeathed me his (rather large!) 78 collection, and all the records played are from his collection. It can be heard on iTunes Here and on Soundcloud HERE

Tracks heard are :

  1. Barnacle Bill the sailor by Bud and Joe Billings (Released by Zonophone (5725) in 1930. Bud and Joe Billings were actually Frank Luther and Carson Robison. Frank Luther was born in 1899 (as Francis Luther Crow), in Kansas. He was musical from an early age but was ordained as a minister in his teens; this was, however,  short lived and from 1921 he devoted himself to music, joining the Revelers in 1927 and touring the UK. The following year, back in the US, he teamed up with Robison and began performing with him as Bud and Joe Billings. Despite their huge popularity and recording many records together, the pair parted in 1932. Although as Bud Billings he released some of the earliest “Hillbilly” (the precursor to Country ‘n’ Western) records, Luther went on to record in several styles- dance bands, children’s records and general popular music. As well as records, he appeared regularly on radio and in short films. He carried on recording right through to the 1970s and died in 1980. Carson Robison was born in 1890, also in Kansas. He was born into a musical family and became a professional musician at the age of 15, although he didn’t make his first recordings until 1924, and became hugely successful through his association with Vernon Dalhart, as a song writer, vocalist and musician in Dalhart’s band. They scored a million seller in 1924 with “The wreck of the old ’97”. The relationship with Dalhart broke down in 1928 after a dispute, and Robison teamed up with Frank Luther for the next four years. In 1932 he formed a new band, The Pioneers, who later changed their name to The Buckaroos. He continued recording and touring through the ’30s and ’40s, and died in 1957.
  2. Barney’s Boarding House by Albert Whelan (Released by Eclipse (154) in 1931.) (More info on Albert Whelan, a favourite of the 78Man podcast, can be found in the blog for the first podcast).
  3. Roger the lodger by Leslie Jerome (Released by Sterno (567) in 1929) Little is known about Leslie Jerome, although this record is on the Sterno label, a label which was only on sale at Mark’s and Spencer’s, and for which a lot of the recordings were by Nat Star’s band under pseudonyms, so maybe Leslie Jerome didn’t exist! “Roger the Lodger” was also recorded by The Two Gilberts. Sterno also released “Berlington Bertie from Bow” under the Leslie Jerome name.
  4. Sometimes I feel like a motherless child by Paul Robeson (Released by Columbia (D.B. 2506) in 1949.) Originally recorded by Robeson in 1926 and released in the UK on His Master’s Voice, this version is a re-recording from 2 decades later. The song is a traditional song which dates back to the days of slavery in the U.S. Paul Robeson was born in 1898 in Princetown, New Jersey to a religious family (his father was a Presbyterian minister, his mother was from a prominent Quaker family). Robeson was a gifted child, excelling in sports as well as acting and singing. He went to University to study law and graduated in 1922. By this time he had appeared on stage as both an actor and singer and he only briefly practiced law as his acting career began to take off. His recording career began in 1926, and in 1928 he appeared in “Showboat” in the UK at the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane and stayed in the UK until 1932 when he returned to Broadway to appear again in “Showboat”. From then he split his time between the UK and the US, and began appearing in films, “Sanders of the river” in 1935 becoming his first major film hit. Robeson started to become increasingly politically active around this time, and was particularly affected by the Spanish Civil war of 1936-39. In 1946 Robeson founded the organisation American Crusade against Lynching and was vocal in his support for the Trade Unions. All this activity led to Robeson being blacklisted in the ’50s in America, and his passport revoked meaning he could not perform abroad. In 1958 he managed to get his passport reinstated, and he  embarked on a World tour. Over the next couple of years his health deteriorated (he and his family believed there was CIA involvement in his health problems) and in 1963 he announced his retirement, spending much of the rest of his life living in seclusion. He died in January 1976 following a stroke.
  5. Laughing PC Brown by Charles Penrose (released by Winner (3717) in 1923). Charles Penrose was born in 1873 in Biggleswade, the son of a jeweller. He initially followed in his Father’s footsteps but developed a stage act using “laughing” songs, and became so popular locally that he gave up jewellery to become a full time entertainer. He began his stage and singing career in the 1890s and his first recordings were made in 1915, but it is “The Laughing Policeman” (first recorded for Regal in 1923, then Columbia in 1926, then Dominion in 1929) for which he is remembered. He recorded many other records, on many labels under several aliases (Charles Jolly, Andrew Merry, The Spoofums), many with his second wife, Mabel Anderson. Most of his songs were credited to Mabel as the writer, under the name Billie Gray. Later he appeared in films and on radio, and died in 1952, aged 79. (More of Penrose’s songs can be heard on the album “78Man presents Charles Penrose”, available for download or streaming at most digital sites).
  6. Buying a stamp by Fred Gibson (Released by Broadcast (287) in 1928). Fred Gibson was a popular comedian in the late ’20s and early ’30s on the London stage but is largely forgotten now. As well as this Broadcast release, he seems to have recorded “Buying a stamp” for at least two other labels-Regal and Unison.
  7. The more we are together (The froth blower’s anthem) by Alfredo’s band (Released by Edison Bell Winner (4553) in 1927.) Alfredo was born Alfred Gill in 1892. He learned to play the violin, and in 1925 formed his own band, which played at the New Princes Restaurant. The band soon won a recording contract with the Edison Bell label, and over the next 5 years recorded many records on the Edison Bell Winner, Edison Bell Electron and Edison Bell Radio labels. Largely forgotten now, Alfredo’s band made some great dance records and are well worth investigating. In 1931 Alfredo changed direction and started recording more gypsy flavoured music, to little success. His recordings seem to have petered out around this time. He died in 1966. An interesting piece of trivia-the trumpet player in Alfredo’s band was Alfie Noakes, father of ’60s/’70s “Blue Peter” presenter John Noakes!
  8. When Tommy Atkins taught the Chinese how to Charleston by Buddy Rose and his dance orchestra (released by Imperial in 1927)
  9. The Party’s Over now by Noel Coward (Released by His Master’s Voice (B 4270) in 1932.) Noel Coward was born in 1899 in Teddington. As a child he was interested in the stage and made his first professional stage appearance at the age of 11. His acting career continued throughout the first world war (he was deemed unfit when conscripted in 1918), and in 1920 wrote and appeared in his first play, “I’ll leave it to you”, which ran for a month with moderate success. His first real success as a playwright came in 1924, with “The Vortex” and the following year he wrote “Hay Fever”, an enduring success. From then on he was very prolific as a writer, with many successes including “Easy virtue” (1926), “Home chat” (1927), “This year of grace” (1928), “Bitter sweet” (1929) and “Private lives” (1930). In 1929 he signed to His Master’s Voice and made many records for them over the next 7 years. During the Second World Ward Coward largely gave up theatre and started working for British Intelligence, in an attempt to influence public opinion in the US to facilitate their joining the war. He did carry on recording during the war (mainly patriotic songs) and appeared in the film “In which we serve”.                                                                            After the war Coward  carried on as a playwright but was less successful but he carried on writing into the 1960s, also having a successful cabaret career, and appearing in several films. The 1960s saw a revival in his popularity, with many of his plays from the ’20s and ’30s being revived. He was knighted in 1969 and died in 1973.

78Man Favourites Volume 1

78Man Favourites Vol. 1 is an album of 20 remastered and restored 78s. It can be heard on Spotify HERE or can be downloaded at various download sites, including Itunes .

Tracks are :

  1. The Music goes ’round and around by Jay Wilbur and his band (1936)
  2. Barnacle Bill the sailor No. 2 by Bud and Joe Billings (1930)
  3. On her doorstep last night by The Rhythmic Troubadours (with vocal chorus by Tom Barratt) (1929)
  4. Captain Ginjah by Harry Fay (1925)
  5. My very good friend the milkman by Jack Jackson and his orchestra (1935)
  6. Painting the clouds with sunshine by Al Benny’s Broadway Boys (1929)
  7. Roger the lodger by Leslie Jerome (1929)
  8. By a waterfall by The Eight Piano Orchestra (1934)
  9. Song of the Emmenthaler valley by The Alpine Yodelling Choir (1929)
  10. The sunshine of your smile by Lilian Davies (1930)
  11. Get away, old man, get away by Frank Crumit (1927)
  12. The bushes at the bottom of the garden by Norman Long (1931)
  13. Put your worries through the mangle by Albert Whelan (1930)
  14. When moaning Minnie moans no more by Mr. Lovejoy, Enoch and Ramsbottom (1941)
  15. I’ve never seen a straight banana by Fred Douglas (1927)
  16. Mucking about the garden by The Two Gilberts (1929)
  17. What’s good for the goose is good for the gander by Ed Lloyd and his band (1934)
  18. The More we are together (The Froth blowers anthem) by Alfredo’s band (Vocal chorus by Peter Bernard) (1927)
  19. What do you give a nudist on her birthday? by Leslie Holmes (1934)
  20. Tiptoe thro the tulips by Honolulu Serenaders (1929)

(Note : Unfortunately due to copyright reasons, this compilation is not available in the USA)