Tag Archives: Dick Haymes

78Man Podcast Number 15-Love

In honour of Valentine’s Day, the February podcast has love as its theme. It can be found on Soundcloud HERE and on Itunes Here . Tracks heard are :

  1. Gosh! I must be falling in love by Leslie Sarony (originally released by Rex Records (8115) in 1934. Leslie Sarony has been on several previous podcasts and you can read more about him in the blog for the first podcast. This song and 39 others are available to stream/download on the 78Man albums “78Man Presents Leslie Sarony” Vols 1 and 2 on itunes, Spotify, etc. You can see the great man himself singing “Peggotty Leg” Here
  2. Under the sweetheart tree by Randolph Sutton (Released by Edison Bell Radio (1426) in 1931.) Randolph Sutton was born in 1888 in Bristol, and made his stage debut in 1913. He soon became a popular singer but only began recording in earnest in the late 1920s. His other recordings include “All by yourself in the moonlight”, “Oh! Arthur! (What have you done to Martha?)”, “Is Izzy Azzy Woz?”, “Drivin’ the geese to market” and “The sun has got his hat on (He’s coming out today)”. Sutton was a successful stage performer, appearing in many pantomimes and revues, as well as radio and TV appearances (he appeared on BBC TV’s “The Good old days” in 1954.) He continued working until his death, making his final stage appearance on 26th February 1969 in St. Albans, two days before he died. A month later, Radio 2 produced a tribute programme, introduced by George Martin. His influence was such that further tribute programmes were made by Radio 2 in 1980 and 1982. You can see him singing “On Mother Kelly’s doorstep” HERE
  3. Love is just like that by Malcolm Desmond (released by Eclipse (155) in 1932). Malcolm Desmond was a pseudonym used by Billy Scott-Coomber when he recorded for the Eclipse label. Other releases include “We’re all going in for hiking”, “Bathing in the sunshine” and “Wagon wheels”. Billy Scott-Coomber was Irish, and first found fame  as the singer in Jack Payne’s band. He made a few records under his own name, such as “June in January” in 1935 and “There’ll always be an England” in 1939. In the 1950’s he was a regular on BBC Radio’s “Children’s Hour”, and was known for his “nursery sing-songs”. In the late ’50s he became a radio producer, (where he was an early champion of Les Dawson), then in the ’60s became the presenter of the radio show “A night at the music hall”. You can see him performing with his singing grenadiers HERE
  4. I’m in love with Susan by Frank Crumit (released by His Master’s Voice (B. 4331) in 1929.) Frank Crumit was born in 1889 in Jackson, Ohio, USA and made his first stage appearance at the age of 5 in a minstrel show. Although he attained a degree in electrical engineering at university, music was his first love and he concentrated on his stage career, first in a group then solo, singing and playing ukulele, appearing on Broadway in 1918 in “Betty be good”. The following year he began recording, some of his earliest recordings being “I’ve Got The Profiteering Blues”, “Good-Bye Dixie Good-Bye”, and “My Little Bimbo Down On The Bamboo Isle” (all released by Columbia in the US in 1920). In 1925 Crumit signed to the Victor label and it was here he recorded some of his best known songs, such as “I’m Sitting On Top Of The World” (1926), “Abdul Abulbul Amir” (1927), “A Gay Caballero” (1928) and “A High Silk Hat And A Walking Cane” (1929). In 1928 Crumit married Julia Sanderson, also a singer, and they started presenting radio shows, including from 1930 onwards, “The battle of the sexes”, which ran until 1943 when Crumit died of a heart attack.
  5. How to make love by Bud Billings (released by Zonophone (5399) in 1929) Bud Billings was the pseudonym of Frank Luther, see Blog for Podcast 9 (Sept 2016) for more info.
  6. You Always Hurt The One You Love by Spike Jones and his City Slickers (released by His Master’s Voice (B.D. 1139) in 1946) More info on Spike Jones can be found in the blog for Podcast 4 (April 2016). Here’s a clip of Spike Jones and his city slickers in action.
  7. Bubbling Over With Love by The Hottentots (released by Eclipse (59) in 1931. The Hottentots were a pseudonym of the Jay Wilbur band (see Podcast 13 blog-January 2017 for more info on Jay Wilbur.) As The Hottentots they recorded several records on Eclipse, including “Sweet Jennie Lee”, “In Geneva with Eva”, “Whistling In The Dark” and “When Yuba Plays The Rumba On The Tuba”. Eclipse Records was run by Woolworths, and provided cheap releases in competition with the major labels. The Woolworths museum site has more information on the label HERE
  8. Do You Love Me by Dick Haymes (released by Brunswick (3726) in 1946) Dick Haymes was born in Argentina in 1918 of British parents, and the family moved to the USA when Dick was a child. After briefly working as a teenage stunt double in films, Haymes began a singing career, becoming the singer for the Harry James Orchestra and in 1942 he replaced Frank Sinatra as the singer in the Tommy Dorsey band. In 1943 he began recording for Decca in the USA (these recordings being released on Brunswick in the UK), releasing songs such as “You’ll never know”, “Put Your Arms Around Me Honey”, and “In Love In Vain”
  9. Falling In Love Again by Al Vocale and his Orchestra (Released by Edison Bell Radio (1389) in 1930.) It would appear that Al Vocale may be a pseudonym for Al Bowlly; this record is mentioned in a couple of Bowlly discographies but details are sketchy. There was at least one other Al Vocale record on Edison Bell Radio, “Say A Little Prayer For Me”/”Waiting For That Thing Called Happiness”.
  10. Goodnight, Sweetheart by Henry Hall and his Gleneagles Hotel Bar Band (Released by Decca (F. 2330) in 1931). Henry Hall was born in London in 1898. He was interested in music from an early age, winning a scholarship to Trinity College of Music, where he studied trumpet, piano, harmony and counterpoint. He formed his own band and began a residency at the Gleneagles Hotel. During the early ’30s Hall’s band became a regular fixture on BBC Radio, broadcasting from Manchester, and in 1932 he took over from Jack Payne as leader of the BBC Dance Orchestra. As well as his radio appearances he made records for Columbia, including “Goodnight Everyone”, “The Man On The Flying Trapeze” and “Red Sails In The Sunset”. During World War 2 Hall entertained the troops both in radio broadcasts and concerts. During the ’50s he carried on broadcasting and playing live, as well as working as an agent and producer. He retired in 1964 and died in 1989.
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