Tag Archives: Edith Piaf

78Man Podcast Number 20-France

The 20th 78Man Podcast has France as its theme. It can be heard on itunes Here or on Soundcloud Here . Tracks heard on the podcast are :

  1. Bells of Normandy by Harry Hudson’s Melody Men with Max Klein (Xylophonist) (Originally released by Edison Bell Radio (1493) in 1931.) Harry Hudson was born in 1898 and began his musical career as part of a double act with fellow singer Stanley Kirkby in 1915. Their association carried on until the mid ’20s. In 1928 Harry Hudson (with his band The Melody Men) started recording for the Edison Bell Radio label, and over the next few years released many records for the label, including “I want to be alone with Mary Brown”, “Misery Farm”, “Moscow”, “Mickey Mouse” and “One little raindrop”. He and his band also recorded under various pseudonyms-Rolando and his Blue Salon Orchestra, Radio Melody Boys, The Blue Jays, and Tanzoni and his Orchestra. Hudson remained active musically until the 1960s, and died in 1969.
  2. La Vie en rose (Take me to your heart again) by Gracie Fields (released by Decca (F. 9031) in 1948. Gracie Fields was born 9 January 1898 in Rochdale and christened Grace Stansfield. She made her first stage appearance at the age of 7 and made her first recordings for His Master’s Voice in 1928, recording one of her biggest hits, “Sally” for them in 1931. In 1935 she moved to Rex Records, her first release for the label being “When I grow too old to dream”/”Turn ‘Erbert’s face to the wall, Mother” on Rex 8557. She recorded for both Rex and Regal Zonophone until moving to Decca in 1941. During this time, of course, she also appeared in several films, including “Sally in our alley” (1931), “Sing as we go!” (1934), “Look up and laugh” (1935), “Queen of hearts” (1936), and “Shipyard Sally” (1939). Gracie spent most of her later life living on the Isle of Capri where she died on 27th September 1979. La Vie en rose was written in 1945 and became one of Edith Piaf’s best known songs. Other cover versions of the song have been recorded by Bing Crosby, Louis Armstrong, Donna Summer and Grace Jones.
  3. Ecris Moi by Tino Rossi (released by Columbia (DF 2377) in 1938). Tino Rossi was born in Corsica in 1907 and went on to become one of France’s biggest ever selling singers, as well as appearing in over 20 films. He died in 1983.
  4. Passe by Jean Sablon (released by Brunswick (03872) in 1946). Jean Sablon was born on March 25 1906 to a musical family-his father was a composer and his siblings were also musicians. He started as a pianist but switched to become a vocalist, making his debut aged 17 in cabaret in Paris. During the ’20s and ’30s he toured extensively, achieving fame in Brazil and the USA, where he later had his own radio show in 1946/7. He also appeared in several films including “The story of Vernon and Irene Castle” (1939), “Miranda” (1948), and “Je connais une blonde” (1963). His popularity in both the UK and USA meant he recorded in both French and English, some of his English recordings including “Can I forget you” (1937), “Two sleepy people” (1939) and “My foolish heart” (1950). He died on February 24 1994.
  5. The poor people of Paris by Winifred Atwell (released by Decca (F. 10681) in 1956). Winifred Atwell was born in Trinidad and Tobago in 1914. She studied pharmacy as her parents were pharmacists, but also played piano, gaining popularity locally. In 1946 she moved to London to study at the Royal Academy of Music. She soon started playing live dates, and made her first BBC Radio appearances in late 1946, although it wasn’t until 1951 that she was signed to Decca and started making records. Her first major hit came in late 1951 with her fourth release “The Black and White Rag”/”Cross hands boogie”, released before the UK singles chart started in 1952. During the rest of the ’50s she had 15 UK chart hits including two number ones-“Let’s have another party” (1954) and “The poor people of Paris” (1956). Other notable hits included “Britannia Rag”, “Flirtation Waltz” and “Port au Prince”. As well as her UK success, she was also hugely popular in Australia, and moved there in the 1970s, by which time her career in the UK had waned (although “The Black and White Rag” was heard regularly as the theme to TV show “Pot black”.) She also had a property in Trinidad where she often stayed . She died in 1983.
  6. Nuits de Paris by Georges Ulmer (released by Columbia (DF 3182) in 1947). Georges Ulmer was born in Denmark in 1919, but grew up in Spain before finding fame in France as a singer and song writer. His most famous song, Pigalle, has been covered by Bing Crosby, Petula Clark, Paul Anka and Jean Sablon, among others. He also appeared in around a dozen films during the ’50s and early ’60s. He died in 1989.
  7. Le barbier de Palermo by Jaques Helian et son Orchestre (released by Pathe (PG 359) in 1950.) Jacques Helian was born in 1912 in Paris. He began his musical career in the early ’30s as a saxophonist for Roland Dorsay’s Orchestra, but after being made a prisoner of war from 1940-1943, he formed his own orchestra. He initially recorded for Columbia, releasing dozens of records for them between 1945 and 1949, before moving to the Pathe label. His Orchestra disbanded in 1957, although Helian performed until the early ’80s. He died in 1986.
  8. The Sunshine of Marseilles by Cavan O’Connor (released by Regal (MR 44) in 1930). Cavan O’Connor was born (as Clarence O’Connor) in Ireland in 1899, but his family moved to England shortly after his birth. He served in the First World War but was injured and demobbed aged 16, and he began his singing career. By the mid ’20s he was appearing in minor roles on stage, in musical theatre and operas, and made his first radio appearance for the BBC in 1925. A couple of years later he began his recording career, first for the Broadcast label, then Regal, Regal Zonophone, Rex and Decca. His records include “Goodnight, Sweetheart” (1931), “My heart is always calling you” (1934), “Shannon River” (1940), and “Little town in the Ould County Down” (1948). He carried on performing until the ’80s, and died in 1997.
  9. Un Refraint Courait dans la rue by Edith Piaf (released by Columbia (4004 F) in 1950.) Edith Piaf was born on 19th December 1915 in Paris. Her father was a street performer of acrobatics, while her mother was a singer in cafes. She was abandoned by her mother soon after birth, and when her father enlisted in the army in 1916 he gave Edith to his mother, who ran a brothel in Normandy. In the late 1920s her father was again working as a street performer and she joined him, and began singing. In 1935 she started singing at Le Gerny’s club off the Champs- Elysees where she was given the nickname La Mome Piaf (The little sparrow). This led to her first recording contract. Over the next decade she became one of the biggest stars in France, and after the war ended in 1945 her fame spread internationally. Piaf had an eventful life, which has been dramatised in several films, most recently and successfully in 2007’s “La Vie en Rose”, named after one of her most famous songs. Piaf carried on working until her death in October 1963 and some of her most famous songs were from relatively late in her career-“Milord” in 1959, and “Non, Je ne regrette Rien” and “Exodus” in 1961.
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78Man Podcast No. 18-Around the World Part 2

This podcast sees the conclusion of our trip around the world and can be heard on Itunes here or on Soundcloud here . Tracks heard on this podcast are :

  1.  Johnny, Tu N’es Pas Un Ange by Edith Piaf (Released by Columbia (DCF 140) in 1953) Edith Piaf was born on 19th December 1915 in Paris. Her father was a street performer of acrobatics, while her mother was a singer in cafes. She was abandoned by her mother soon after birth, and when her father enlisted in the army in 1916 he gave Edith to his mother, who ran a brothel in Normandy. In the late 1920s her father was again working as a street performer and she joined him, and began singing. In 1935 she started singing at Le Gerny’s club off the Champs- Elysees where she was given the nickname La Mome Piaf (The little sparrow). This led to her first recording contract. Over the next decade she became one of the biggest stars in France, and after the war ended in 1945 her fame spread internationally. Piaf had an eventful life, which has been dramatised in several films, most recently and successfully in 2007’s “La Vie en Rose”, named after one of her most famous songs. Piaf carried on working until her death in October 1963 and some of her most famous songs were from relatively late in her career-“Milord” in 1959, and “Non, Je ne regrette Rien” and “Exodus” in 1961.
  2. Shanghai by Robert English (Released by Parlophone (E-5360) in 1925) Little is known about Robert English, but he recorded other records such as “Where can I find a pal like Mother?”, “Tell all the world” and “Peggy O’Halloran”. He also recorded as Robert Howe in the 1910s.
  3. Royal Anthem of Roumania by Jumbo Military Band (Released by Jumbo (1449) in 1916.) The Jumbo label ran from 1908 to 1919 and released records by well known artistes such as George Formby (senior), Stanley Kirkby, The Two Filberts and Miss Jessie Broughton. The Jumbo Military band recorded several records for the label including a cover of Irving Berlin’s “Everybody’s doing it” “At a Georgia camp meeting” and “Selection of Pantomime melodies”.
  4. In Old Madrid by Jack Payne and his BBC Dance Orchestra (Released by Columbia (CB 321) in 1931. (see below)
  5. Moscow by Gracie Fields (Released by His Master’s Voice (B 3244) in 1929) Gracie Fields was born 9 January 1898 in Rochdale and christened Grace Stansfield. She made her first stage appearance at the age of 7 and made her first recordings for His Master’s Voice in 1928, recording one of her biggest hits, “Sally” for them in 1931. In 1935 she moved to Rex Records, her first release for the label being “When I grow too old to dream”/”Turn ‘Erbert’s face to the wall, Mother” on Rex 8557. She recorded for both Rex and Regal Zonophone until moving to Decca in 1941. Among her other big hits are “Walter Walter (lead me to the altar”)”, “The biggest aspidistra in the world”, “Wish me luck”, and “Clogs and shawl”. Although often remembered for her comedic songs, she recorded many non comedic romantic and religious songs. During this time, of course, she also appeared in several films, including “Sally in our alley” (1931), “Sing as we go!” (1934), “Look up and laugh” (1935), “Queen of hearts” (1936), and “Shipyard Sally” (1939). Gracie spent most of her later life living on the Isle of Capri where she died on 27th September 1979. Watch Gracie singing “The sweetest song in the world” from the film “We’re going to be rich” Here
  6. Underneath The Russian Moon by The Rhythm Maniacs (Released by Decca (F. 1583) in 1929). Decca Records was founded in early 1929 by Edward Lewis, and he decided the label should have a “house” band, which was The Rhythm Maniacs under the direction of Philip Lewis, and featuring Arthur Lally on saxophone and Sylvester Ahola on Trumpet. They were active for around 3 years,until Philip Lewis’ premature death in 1931; Arthur Lally played with Ambrose’s band and The Savoy Orpheans, as well as recording with his own band The Million-aires. He died in 1940 aged 39. The Rhythm Maniacs other records include “The wedding in the ark”, “When it’s springtime in the Rockies”, “What good am I without you?” and “Keepin’ out of mischief now”.
  7. My Californian Girl by The Elliotts (Released by The Winner (3323) in 1919) The Elliotts released many records for the Winner label in the 1910s and early ’20s, including “Down Home in Tennessee”, “After you’ve gone”, “Pucker up and whistle” and “Last night on the back porch”.
  8. Hunting Tigers Out In Indiah by Jack Payne and his BBC Dance Orchestra (Released by Columbia (CB 151) in 1930) (See Podcast 2 blog for more info on Jack Payne). There’s a great clip of Jack Payne and his band performing “Tiger Rag” in Paris here
  9. Welsh Medley by Savoy Orpheans at the Savoy Hotel, London (Released by Columbia (3403) in 1924.) The Savoy Orpheans were the resident band at The Savoy Hotel in London between 1923 and 1927, and were formed by Debroy Somers (born 1890, died 1952). During this time they released many records, including “Madame Pompadour”, “Say it with a Ukulele”, “What’ll I do” and “Let’s all go to Mary’s house”. When their tenure with the hotel ended at the end of 1927 they disbanded, although in 1931 several ex members, including pianist Carroll Gibbons formed a new band under the name The Savoy Hotel Orpheans. Debroy Somers went on to lead a band using his own name, who recorded many records throughout the ’30s and into the early ’40s.