Tag Archives: Gracie Fields

78Man Podcast Number 30-Leslie Sarony

The 30th 78Man Podcast looks at Leslie Sarony and can be heard on itunes Here or on Soundcloud Here

Tracks heard on the podcast are :

  1. Let me carry your bag to Bagdad Dad by Leslie Sarony (Released by Regal Zonphone (MR 1967) in 1936).
  2. Don’t be cruel to a vegetebuel by Leslie Sarony (Released by His Master’s Voice (B. 2714) in 1928).
  3. I Lift up my finger and I say “Tweet Tweet” by Gracie Fields (Released by His Master’s Voice (B. 2999) in 1929).
  4. Rhymes by Albert Whelan (Released by Imperial (2605) in 1932).
  5. The Chicken or the egg by Leslie Sarony (Released by Victory (141) in 1929).
  6. Mucking about the garden by Jack Hylton and his Orchestra (Released by His Master’s Voice (B 5696) in 1929).
  7. The Prosperity Song by Bert Layton (Released by Eclipse (69) in 1931).
  8. Coo! Lovaduck! Crikey!Coo!Blimey! by The Two Leslies (Released by Regal Zonophone (MR 2034) in 1936).
  9. Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead Parts 1 & 2 by Leslie Sarony (Released by Imperial (2688) in 1932).

If Leslie Sarony is remembered at all today, it is usually for writing “Jollity Farm” (covered by The Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band on their 1967 album “Gorilla”) or “Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead”, still a popular song at funerals (and the first record to be banned by the BBC on the grounds of taste), but from the late ’20s to the end of the ’30s he was one of the UK’s most popular singers, releasing hundreds of songs on a plethora of labels, initially as a solo artist and later as part of The Two Leslies, with Leslie Holmes.  Sarony was born (as Leslie Legge Frye, his stage name of Sarony being his Mother’s maiden name) in January 1897. He began appearing on stage as a teenager but his singing career was cut short by World War One. Having survived the war he returned to the stage but it wasn’t until 1926 that he began his recording career. Over the ensuing decade and a half he recorded for Imperial, Eclipse (the Woolworths label), Victory, His Master’s Voice, Regal Zonophone, Edison Bell Radio, Rex and Parlophone among others. Making sense of the Sarony discography is a hard task, as he often recorded for different labels simultaneously, even recording multiple versions of the same song for different labels. He wrote many of his best known songs himself- “Rhymes” (covered by The Goons when they briefly reformed in the ’70s), “Gorgonzola”, “I lift up my finger and I say Tweet Tweet” “Over the garden wall” (the latter two covered by Gracie Fields), “Mucking about the garden” and “Tom thumb’s drum”. Many singers of the time recorded cover versions of Leslie’s songs. As well as writing his own songs he also covered some of the best comic songs of the day-“All by yourself in the moonlight”, “Hunting tigers out in India” (another Bonzos cover), “The old kitchen kettle” and “He played his ukulele as the ship went down” along with the lesser known classics “There’s a song they sing at a sing song in Sing Sing” and “When H’I was H’out in H’India”. What’s great about these rarely heard recordings is that 80 odd years later they’re still funny, if perhaps not always as politically correct as would be acceptable today! In 1933 Sarony teamed up with Leslie Holmes (a fellow singer of novelty songs, known as “the man with the smiling voice”) and for the next 12 years they performed as The Two Leslies recording many records such as “Sweet Fanny Adams”, “I’m a little prarie flower”, “Miss Porkington would like cream puffs” and “Umpa Umpa (stick it up your jumper)” (a phrase used at the end of The Beatles’ “I am the walrus”-wonder if John Lennon had heard the record?) 

Apart from an album made by Roy Hudd in 1980, Sarony didn’t record commercially after 1940 but was constantly working on stage and TV both as a singer and actor-he had appeared in several films during the ’30s and ’40s and later acted on TV shows such as Nearest and Dearest, The Gaffer, I didn’t know you cared and Minder. He worked into his 80s, appearing in Paul McCartney’s film “Give my regards to Broad Street” in 1984 and the Monty Python short “The Crimson Permanent Assurance” in 1983. Leslie died on Feb 12th 1985, and his final two TV appearances-cameos in an episode of the first series of Victoria Wood As seen on TV, and an episode of “There comes a time” (a short lived comedy starring Andrew Sachs) both aired posthumously.

There are now 4 volumes of “78Man Presents Leslie Sarony” available on most major streaming and download sites as well as on CD, each volume contains 20 tracks, many not commercially available for over 80 years. In addition, the album “Songs that Leslie Sarony taught us” features 20 cover versions of songs written by Sarony. CDs can be ordered HERE

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78Man Presents Podcast Number 26-Medleys

 

The 26th 78Man Presents podcast features Medleys, and can be found on Itunes Here and on Soundcloud Here .

 

1. Let’s Have a Party Parts 1 & 2 by Winifred Atwell (Released by Philips (PB 213) in 1953). Winifred Atwell was born in Trinidad and Tobago in 1914. She studied pharmacy as her parents were pharmacists, but also played piano, gaining popularity locally. In 1946 she moved to London to study at the Royal Academy of Music. She soon started playing live dates, and made her first BBC Radio appearances in late 1946, although it wasn’t until 1951 that she was signed to Decca and started making records. Her first major hit came in late 1951 with her fourth release “The Black and White Rag”/”Cross hands boogie”, released before the UK singles chart started in 1952. During the rest of the ’50s she had 15 UK chart hits including two number ones-“Let’s have another party” (1954) and “The poor people of Paris” (1956). Other notable hits included “Britannia Rag”, “Flirtation Waltz” and “Port au Prince”. As well as her UK success, she was also hugely popular in Australia, and moved there in the 1970s, by which time her career in the UK had waned (although “The Black and White Rag” was heard regularly as the theme to TV show “Pot black”.) She also had a property in Trinidad where she often stayed . She died in 1983.

2. Tunes With Pep No. 1 by The Bugle Call Raggers (Released by Decca (F 5483) in 1935). The Bugle Call Raggers took their name from the 1922 composition “Bugle Call Rag”, first recorded by The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, and later covered by Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway and Muggsy Spanier, among many others. They were actually a pseudonym used by Harry Roy and his band, and also released “Temptation Rag” (1936), and “Alexander’s got a swing band now” in 1938. Harry Roy was born Harry Lipman on 12th January 1900 in Stamford Hill, London. In his teens he started performing with his brother Sidney, Harry playing clarinet and saxophone. They paid their dues in the ’20s playing venues like the Cafe de Paris and London Coliseum, also touring Germany, Australia and South Africa under a variety of band names. By the early ’30s Harry was fronting his own band and in 1931 co-wrote the notorious and much covered song “My girl’s pussy”. He made many records for Parlophone during the ’30s, including “Twelfth Street rag”(1933), “Alexander’s Ragtime Band”(1934),”Make funny faces at your neighbours”(1935) and “Beer barrel polka”(1939) before moving on to Regal Zonophone in the ’40s where his recordings included “He’s my uncle”(1940),”Mister Brown of London town”(1941),”Der Fuehrer’s Face”(1942), and “When you wore a tulip”(1943). His recording career ended in the early 50’s and he retired from music until 1969 when he was involved with the musical “Oh Clarence” at the Lyric Theatre in London. He died on 1st February 1971.

3. The Harry Lauder Medley Part 2 by The Victory Band (Released by Decca (F 8298) in 1943). Harry Lauder was born in 1870 in Edinburgh. His Father died when he was 11, and by the age of 14 he was working in a colliery, where he used to sing to his fellow workers. This led to engagements in local music halls, and in 1894 he turned professional. In 1900 he moved down to London where he became immediately successful. Over the next few years his fame grew and he toured America for the first time in 1907. He made his first recordings in 1905 and he recorded prolifically up until the early 1930s. Following his first flush of success (in 1911 he became the highest paid entertainer in the world), Lauder spent much of the Great War raising money for the war effort, for which he was knighted in 1919. The war held personal tragedy for Lauder; his son John was killed in December 1916 at Pozieres. John’s death inspired Lauder to write “The end of the road” which became one of his best known songs. Despite retiring in 1935, Lauder also entertained the troops during World War 2. He died in February 1950.

4. Gracie’s Hit Medley No. 2 Part 1 by Gracie Fields (Released by Regal Zonophone (MR 3054) in 1938). Gracie Fields was born 9 January 1898 in Rochdale and christened Grace Stansfield. She made her first stage appearance at the age of 7 and made her first recordings for His Master’s Voice in 1928, recording one of her biggest hits, “Sally” for them in 1931. Other recordings for His Master’s Voice include “Like the big pots do” (1929), “Painting the clouds with sunshine” (1930), “Just One More Chance” (1931) and “Rochdale Hounds” (1932). In 1935 she moved to Rex Records, her first release for the label being “When I grow too old to dream”/”Turn ‘Erbert’s face to the wall, Mother”. Further Rex releases included “Red Sails in the sunset” (1935), “Did your Mother come from Ireland ?” (1936) and “Lambeth Walk” (1938). She recorded for both Rex and Regal Zonophone until moving to Decca in 1941. In the late ’50s she moved to Columbia Records. During this time, of course, she also appeared in several films, including “Sally in our alley” (1931), “Sing as we go!” (1934), “Look up and laugh” (1935), “Queen of hearts” (1936), and “Shipyard Sally” (1939). Gracie spent most of her later life living on the Isle of Capri where she died on 27th September 1979.

5. Say it with music selection by Jack Simpson and the Freedom boys (Released by Decca (MW 227) in 1945). Jack Simpson was born in September 1905 in Croydon, Surrey, UK. He began playing music as a child, making his first stage appearance at the age of 11, and became known as a xylophone and marimba player. He began recording in the early ’40s with his band The Jack Simpson Sextet, his records including “Oasis” (1941), “Dish me a dish” (1942),  “Stage Coach” (1942), “Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition” (1943), “Jack’s the boy for work” (1949) and “Stick it on the wall Mrs Riley” (1950). He also appeared in the films “Musical Contrasts” (1946) and “Nothing Venture” (1948). He died in 1977.

6. The Naughty Nineties Part 4 by The Old Timers Sketch Company with Fred Hartley’s Quintet (Released by Columbia (DB 1259) in 1935). Fred Hartley was born in Scotland in 1905, and became a pianist after studying at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He made his first broadcast in 1925, and formed his Quintet in 1931. The Quintet made many BBC radio broadcasts, and in 1946 Fred was made Head of BBC Light Music. He also composed piano pieces, sometimes publishing his compositions under the pseudonym Iris Taylor. He died in 1980.

7. A Selection of popular hits Part 2 by Primo Scala’s Accordion Band (Released by Rex Records (8044) in 1933). Many records were released by Primo Scala and his banjo and accordion band, but Primo Scala didn’t exist-it was a pseudonym used by Harry Bidgood, who was born in London in 1898. Bidgood released records under his own name, as well as Nat Lewis, Rossini and Don Porto. He was also musical director on several George Formby films. He was still broadcasting regularly as Primo Scala up to his death in November 1957. Other Primo Scala releases include “The man on the flying trapeze”(1935), “Why did she fall for the leader of the band?”(1936), “The echo told me a lie”(1949) and “Mockin’ Bird Hill”(1951).

8. Swing it George Parts 1 & 2 by George Formby (Released by Regal Zonophone (MR 3103) in 1939). George Formby (and his father George Formby senior) are covered in the blog for the 8th podcast, which featured both men. Read it Here . If you want a more visual telling of George’s story, there’s a documentary on his life Here.

78Man Podcast Number 24a-Same Title, Different Song

Podcast Number 24a is an extra podcast for November 2017, and features songs released on 78 which share their title with later hit songs. It can be heard on itunes Here and on Soundcloud Here . Tracks heard on the podcast are :

  1. Rambling rose by Billy Thorburn’s The Organ, The Dance Band And Me. (Originally Released by Parlophone (F 2308) in 1948). Billy Thorburn was born in 1900, the son of a church verger. As a child he learned to play the organ and became the church organist at the age of 9. After The Great War ended he began playing in bands, including one at the Regent Palace Hotel, and then went on to appear on radio from 1923 onwards as “Uncle Jazz”. A year or so later he joined The Savoy Orpheans, with whom he made his first recordings. After leaving The Savoy Orpheans in 1927, Billy spent the next 6 years with the Jay Wilbur band, recording with them for Dominion, Imperial and Eclipse, as well as playing piano on records from that period by Elsie Carlisle, Charles Penrose, George Formby and Tommy Handley among others. He then joined Jack Payne’s band for a couple of years before forming his own band and began recording for Parlophone as Billy Thorburn and his music in 1936. The following year the band began a regular radio programme, “The Organ, The Dance Band and Me” which became very popular, and led to the band being billed as such on record. The band recorded many records for Parlophone up to the late ’50s, including “There’s Something Wrong With The Weather” (1939), “Meet Mr Callaghan” (1942), “Hey Ho, It’s Love Again” (1943), “Down our way” (1945), “Among My Souvenirs” (1947) and “Saturday Rag” (1952). Billy retired from music in the late ’50s and during the ’60s ran a pub, The Green Dragon in Barnet with his wife Ivy (who he’d been married to since 1923). He died in 1971.
  2. Mona Lisa by Roma’s Accordion Band (Released by Imperial (2653) in 1932). Roma’s Accordion band was another band name used as a pseudonym by Harry Bidgood, alongside Primo Scala and Don Porto. Harry Bidgood was born in London in 1898. He was also musical director on several George Formby films. He was still broadcasting regularly as Primo Scala up to his death in November 1957. Other releases as Roma’s Accordion band include “Leave me alone with my dreams” and “Same old Moon”.
  3. Yesterday by The Radio Imps (Released by Imperial (1732) in 1927) The Radio Imps were a duo, comprising Gerald Underhill Macy and Ed Smalle. Their recording career lasted for around four years between 1926 and 1930 and other recordings include “Where do you work-a John?” (1926), “Hello! Swanee, Hello! (1927), “Constantinople” (1928), “Big City Blues” (1929), and “Ain’t life a load of happiness” (1930). Ed Smalle (1887-1968) also recorded under his own name and with Radio Aces, The Arkansas Trio, The Merrymakers, The Revellers and The Singing Sophomores. Gerald Underhill Macy (1891-1961) also recorded with Duke Yellman’s Orchestra, and was in Radio Aces with Ed Smalle.
  4. Alone by Gracie Fields (Released by Rex Records (8768) in 1936.) Gracie Fields was born 9 January 1898 in Rochdale and christened Grace Stansfield. She made her first stage appearance at the age of 7 and made her first recordings for His Master’s Voice in 1928, recording one of her biggest hits, “Sally” for them in 1931. Other recordings for His Master’s Voice include “Like the big pots do” (1929), “Painting the clouds with sunshine” (1930), “Just One More Chance” (1931) and “Rochdale Hounds” (1932).  In 1935 she moved to Rex Records, her first release for the label being “When I grow too old to dream”/”Turn ‘Erbert’s face to the wall, Mother”. Further Rex releases included “Red Sails in the sunset” (1935), “Did your Mother come from Ireland ?” (1936) and “Lambeth Walk” (1938). She recorded for both Rex and Regal Zonophone until moving to Decca in 1941. During this time, of course, she also appeared in several films, including “Sally in our alley” (1931), “Sing as we go!” (1934), “Look up and laugh” (1935), “Queen of hearts” (1936), and “Shipyard Sally” (1939). Gracie spent most of her later life living on the Isle of Capri where she died on 27th September 1979. Two years before her death she appeared on the Parkinson TV programme in a lengthy interview which can be seen on You Tube Here .
  5. Goodnight Vienna by Robert Chester (Released by Eclipse (291) in 1932.) Robert Chester recorded two other records for the Eclipse label,  “A King of the road am I”, and “You are my heart’s delight” but otherwise very little is known about him. Some sources say Robert Chester was a pseudonym for the actor Darroll Richards, however this is unconfirmed.
  6. Only You by Oscar Rabin and his Strict Tempo Band (Released by Decca (F. 8240) in 1942.) Oscar Rabin was born in Latvia in 1899, and his family emigrated to the UK when he was a child. He began learning music as a child, becoming a professional musician at the age of 15 and attended the Guildhall School of Music. After serving in the First World War, he formed The Romany Five with Harry Davis in 1922, playing violin. Over the next  few years the band expanded and took Oscar’s name, and he switched to playing bass saxophone. Records released by Oscar Rabin include “Hold me” (1933), “Deep in a dream” (1939), “Dancing in the dark” (1941), “Deep in the heart of Texas” (1943), “Moonlight Serenade” (1946), and “Cherokee” (1949). Oscar Rabin died in 1958.
  7. Sweet Fanny Adams by The Two Leslies (Released by Regal Zonophone (MR 1922) in 1935.) The Two Leslies comprised Leslie Sarony (See Podcast 1 blog) and Leslie Holmes (Born in Newcastle upon Tyne, 1902, died in Hove, 1960.). Holmes, like Sarony, was a singer of novelty songs (and covered many of Sarony’s compositions) although not as prolific or successful. His solo recordings included “I’ve gone and lost my little Yo-Yo”,”The old kitchen kettle”,”Ask me another”(all 1932),”What do you give a nudist on her birthday?”(1934) and “Winter draws on”(1935). The pair joined forces in 1935 and performed as a duo until 1946. The Two Leslies records included “The New Sow”, “The Campbells are coming”, “I’m a little prairie flower” and “So ‘Andsome”.
  8. Dinner at Eight by Jack Payne and His Band (Released by Imperial (2919) in 1933.) Jack Payne was born on 22 August 1899 and began his musical career playing piano while serving in the Royal Air Force during World War One. During the ’20s he moved to London and joined a band which became the house band at London’s Hotel Cecil. Appearances on BBC Radio followed and in 1928 Payne became the BBC Director of Dance Music and the leader of the BBC’s first official dance band. They made many records, including “Riding on a camel” (1929), “On her doorstep last night” (1929), “Sittin’ on a five barred gate” (1930) and “Goodnight sweetheart” (1931) and also appeared in the films “Say it with music” (1932) and “Sunshine ahead” (1936). Jack Payne died on 4 December 1969.
  9. Avalon by The Black Diamonds Band (Released by Zonophone (2115) in 1921.) The Black Diamonds Band were one of the first recorded acts, making records as early as 1904 (initially on one sided Zonophone releases). They had a lengthy career, into the early ’30s although it is unclear if the band remained the same throughout these years or whether the name was used for recordings by different bands. Other releases by The Black Diamonds Band include “El Capitan March” (1904), “Miss Dixie” (1908), “The Policeman’s Holiday” (1912), “We all went marching home” (1915), “Amazon River of Dreams” (1921), “In a Clockmaker’s shop” (1929) and “Washington Post March” (1932).
  10. Mama by Oscar Denes and Lizzi Waldmuller (Released by His Master’s Voice (B 3946) in 1931). Oscar Denes was born in Magyarkeszi, Austria-Hungary in 1891, and died in 1950. As an actor he appeared in “Ben Kolumbusz” (1921), “Victoria and her Hussar” (1931, from which “Mama” is taken) and “Roxy Und Das Wunderteam” (1938). Lizzi Waldmuller was born in Knittelfeld, Styria, Austria in 1904, and died in 1945. She appeared in many films, including “Love at first sight ” (1932), “Peer Gynt” (1934), “Bel Ami” (1939), “Traummusik” (1940) and “The Night in Venice” (1942).

78Man albums to be released on CD

Over the last year there have been a series of 78Man albums released digitally on download and streaming sites. Now, they are being made available on made to order CDs, with the first three available now. The first three releases are 78Man Favourites Vol. 1, 78Man presents Charles Penrose, and Songs that Leslie Sarony taught us. They are avaible from Etsy Here , Discogs Here , Ebay from our nominated seller decal23 , or you can order directly from here, by making a Paypal payment to 78man@pobroadband.co.uk – CDs cost £5 each inc p&p in the UK, £6.25 in Europe, and £7.50 for rest of world (inc. p&p). (State which title(s) you require in comments). More releases will be announced shortly.

Track listings for the CDs are :

78Man Favourites Vol. 1 :

  1. The Music goes ’round and around by Jay Wilbur and his band (1936)
  2. Barnacle Bill the sailor No. 2 by Bud and Joe Billings (1930)
  3. On her doorstep last night by The Rhythmic Troubadours (with vocal chorus by Tom Barratt) (1929)
  4. Captain Ginjah by Harry Fay (1925)
  5. My very good friend the milkman by Jack Jackson and his orchestra (1935)
  6. Painting the clouds with sunshine by Al Benny’s Broadway Boys (1929)
  7. Roger the lodger by Leslie Jerome (1929)
  8. By a waterfall by The Eight Piano Orchestra (1934)
  9. Song of the Emmenthaler valley by The Alpine Yodelling Choir (1929)
  10. The sunshine of your smile by Lilian Davies (1930)
  11. Get away, old man, get away by Frank Crumit (1927)
  12. The bushes at the bottom of the garden by Norman Long (1931)
  13. Put your worries through the mangle by Albert Whelan (1930)
  14. When moaning Minnie moans no more by Mr. Lovejoy, Enoch and Ramsbottom (1941)
  15. I’ve never seen a straight banana by Fred Douglas (1927)
  16. Mucking about the garden by The Two Gilberts (1929)
  17. What’s good for the goose is good for the gander by Ed Lloyd and his band (1934)
  18. The More we are together (The Froth blowers anthem) by Alfredo’s band (Vocal chorus by Peter Bernard) (1927)
  19. What do you give a nudist on her birthday? by Leslie Holmes (1934)
  20. Tiptoe thro the tulips by Honolulu Serenaders (1929)

78Man Presents Charles Penrose :

  1. My Giggling Typist (as Charles Jolly and Kaye Connor, Regal MR 331, 1931)
  2. The Laughing Bachelor (as Charles Penrose, Columbia 4236, 1927)
  3. A Merry Little Laugh (as Charles Jolly, Regal G 7896, 1923)
  4. Laughing Stuttering Sam (as Charles Penrose, Columbia DB 856, 1931)
  5. Army Laughs (as Charles Penrose, Colmbia 4691, 1927)
  6. Dismal Desmond the Despondent Dalmatian (as Charles Penrose, Columbia 4236, 1927)
  7. Felix Keeps on Laughing (as Charles Penrose, Winner 4277, 1924)
  8. Happy Herbert (as Charles Jolly, Regal G 7922, 1923)
  9. Laughs and Frills (as Charles Jolly and Kaye Connor, Regal MR 723, 1932)
  10. Seeing Each Other Home (as Charles Penrose, Winner 3910, 1923)
  11. Happy Hikers (as Charles Penrose and Company, Columbia DB 856, 1931)
  12. The Laughing Bassoon (as Charles Jolly and Kaye Connor, Regal MR 723, 1932)
  13. The Laughing Nippy (as The Spoofums, Eclipse SC 26, 1933)
  14. The Laughing Speed Cop (as Joy Day and Merry Andrew, Broadcast 765, 1931)
  15. Young Ideas (as Charles Jolly, Regal G 7922, 1923)
  16. The Laughing Widow (as The Spoofums, Eclipse SC 26, 1933)
  17. The Perpetual Laugh (as Charles Jolly, Regal 7135, 1915)
  18. When I got home (as Charles Penrose, Winner 3910, 1923)
  19. Two Old Sports No. 1-Gouty but Gay (as Penrose and Whitlock, Regal G 7566, 1920)
  20. Two Old Sports No. 2-Merry and Bright (as Penrose and Whitlock, Regal G 7566, 1920)

Songs that Leslie Sarony taught us :

  1. Why build a wall round a graveyard by Roy Leslie (originally released on Eclipse 620 in 1934).
  2. In these hard times by Leonard Henry (Sterno 993, 1932)
  3. Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead pt 1 & 2 by George Buck and The Roysterers (Edison Bell Winner 5474, 1932)
  4. Jollity Farm by Hal Swain and his band (Regal G 9440, 1929)
  5. Come in Mr Cummin by Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5429, 1929)
  6. I’m a little prarie flower by Billy Cotton and his band (Rex 9180, 1937)
  7. I lift up my finger and I say “tweet tweet” by Gracie Fields (His Master’s Voice B 2999, 1929)
  8. Gorgonzola by The Two Gilberts (Regal MR 198, 1930)
  9. Bunkey doodle I doh by Harry Hudson’s Melody Men (Edison Bell Radio 1300, 1930)
  10. Wheezy Anna by Roy Leslie (Eclipse 374, 1933)
  11. Wheezy Anna’s wedding day by Billy Cotton and his band (Regal Zonophone MR 1141, 1934)
  12. More Rhymes, Pt 1 & 2 by White Star Syncopators (Piccadilly 893, 1931)
  13. Over the garden wall by Albert Whelan (Imperial 2272, 1929)
  14. Shut the gate by The Two Gilberts (MR 180, 1930)
  15. Forty Seven ginger headed sailors by Jack Hylton and his Orchestra (His Master’s Voice B 5542, 1928)
  16. Mucking about the garden by Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5429, 1929)
  17. Topsy Turvy Talk by Albert Whelan (Imperial 2453, 1931)
  18. Let’s all sing the lard song by Harry Bidgood and his broadcasters (Broadcast 185, 1927)
  19. Don’t do that to the poor puss cat by Stanley Kirkby (Edison Bell Radio 862, 1928)
  20. Once aboard the lugger, Pt 1 & 2 by Randolph Sutton (Imperial 2644, 1932)

New 78Man album : Songs that Leslie Sarony Taught us

Songs that Leslie Sarony taught us is a Various Artists compilation which features 20 tracks written (or co-written) by Leslie Sarony and covered by other artists. Although Sarony recorded his own versions of these songs it was common in the late ’20s and early ’30s for multiple versions of popular songs to be released. Tracks on the album are ;

  1. Why build a wall round a graveyard by Roy Leslie (originally released on Eclipse 620 in 1934).
  2. In these hard times by Leonard Henry (Sterno 993, 1932)
  3. Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead pt 1 & 2 by George Buck and The Roysterers (Edison Bell Winner 5474, 1932)
  4. Jollity Farm by Hal Swain and his band (Regal G 9440, 1929)
  5. Come in Mr Cummin by Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5429, 1929)
  6. I’m a little prarie flower by Billy Cotton and his band (Rex 9180, 1937)
  7. I lift up my finger and I say “tweet tweet” by Gracie Fields (His Master’s Voice B 2999, 1929)
  8. Gorgonzola by The Two Gilberts (Regal MR 198, 1930)
  9. Bunkey doodle I doh by Harry Hudson’s Melody Men (Edison Bell Radio 1300, 1930)
  10. Wheezy Anna by Roy Leslie (Eclipse 374, 1933)
  11. Wheezy Anna’s wedding day by Billy Cotton and his band (Regal Zonophone MR 1141, 1934)
  12. More Rhymes, Pt 1 & 2 by White Star Syncopators (Piccadilly 893, 1931)
  13. Over the garden wall by Albert Whelan (Imperial 2272, 1929)
  14. Shut the gate by The Two Gilberts (MR 180, 1930)
  15. Forty Seven ginger headed sailors by Jack Hylton and his Orchestra (His Master’s Voice B 5542, 1928)
  16. Mucking about the garden by Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5429, 1929)
  17. Topsy Turvy Talk by Albert Whelan (Imperial 2453, 1931)
  18. Let’s all sing the lard song by Harry Bidgood and his broadcasters (Broadcast 185, 1927)
  19. Don’t do that to the poor puss cat by Stanley Kirkby (Edison Bell Radio 862, 1928)
  20. Once aboard the lugger, Pt 1 & 2 by Randolph Sutton (Imperial 2644, 1932)

The album is available on streaming sites such as Spotify and downoad sites such as Itunes .

78Man Podcast Number 20-France

The 20th 78Man Podcast has France as its theme. It can be heard on itunes Here or on Soundcloud Here . Tracks heard on the podcast are :

  1. Bells of Normandy by Harry Hudson’s Melody Men with Max Klein (Xylophonist) (Originally released by Edison Bell Radio (1493) in 1931.) Harry Hudson was born in 1898 and began his musical career as part of a double act with fellow singer Stanley Kirkby in 1915. Their association carried on until the mid ’20s. In 1928 Harry Hudson (with his band The Melody Men) started recording for the Edison Bell Radio label, and over the next few years released many records for the label, including “I want to be alone with Mary Brown”, “Misery Farm”, “Moscow”, “Mickey Mouse” and “One little raindrop”. He and his band also recorded under various pseudonyms-Rolando and his Blue Salon Orchestra, Radio Melody Boys, The Blue Jays, and Tanzoni and his Orchestra. Hudson remained active musically until the 1960s, and died in 1969.
  2. La Vie en rose (Take me to your heart again) by Gracie Fields (released by Decca (F. 9031) in 1948. Gracie Fields was born 9 January 1898 in Rochdale and christened Grace Stansfield. She made her first stage appearance at the age of 7 and made her first recordings for His Master’s Voice in 1928, recording one of her biggest hits, “Sally” for them in 1931. In 1935 she moved to Rex Records, her first release for the label being “When I grow too old to dream”/”Turn ‘Erbert’s face to the wall, Mother” on Rex 8557. She recorded for both Rex and Regal Zonophone until moving to Decca in 1941. During this time, of course, she also appeared in several films, including “Sally in our alley” (1931), “Sing as we go!” (1934), “Look up and laugh” (1935), “Queen of hearts” (1936), and “Shipyard Sally” (1939). Gracie spent most of her later life living on the Isle of Capri where she died on 27th September 1979. La Vie en rose was written in 1945 and became one of Edith Piaf’s best known songs. Other cover versions of the song have been recorded by Bing Crosby, Louis Armstrong, Donna Summer and Grace Jones.
  3. Ecris Moi by Tino Rossi (released by Columbia (DF 2377) in 1938). Tino Rossi was born in Corsica in 1907 and went on to become one of France’s biggest ever selling singers, as well as appearing in over 20 films. He died in 1983.
  4. Passe by Jean Sablon (released by Brunswick (03872) in 1946). Jean Sablon was born on March 25 1906 to a musical family-his father was a composer and his siblings were also musicians. He started as a pianist but switched to become a vocalist, making his debut aged 17 in cabaret in Paris. During the ’20s and ’30s he toured extensively, achieving fame in Brazil and the USA, where he later had his own radio show in 1946/7. He also appeared in several films including “The story of Vernon and Irene Castle” (1939), “Miranda” (1948), and “Je connais une blonde” (1963). His popularity in both the UK and USA meant he recorded in both French and English, some of his English recordings including “Can I forget you” (1937), “Two sleepy people” (1939) and “My foolish heart” (1950). He died on February 24 1994.
  5. The poor people of Paris by Winifred Atwell (released by Decca (F. 10681) in 1956). Winifred Atwell was born in Trinidad and Tobago in 1914. She studied pharmacy as her parents were pharmacists, but also played piano, gaining popularity locally. In 1946 she moved to London to study at the Royal Academy of Music. She soon started playing live dates, and made her first BBC Radio appearances in late 1946, although it wasn’t until 1951 that she was signed to Decca and started making records. Her first major hit came in late 1951 with her fourth release “The Black and White Rag”/”Cross hands boogie”, released before the UK singles chart started in 1952. During the rest of the ’50s she had 15 UK chart hits including two number ones-“Let’s have another party” (1954) and “The poor people of Paris” (1956). Other notable hits included “Britannia Rag”, “Flirtation Waltz” and “Port au Prince”. As well as her UK success, she was also hugely popular in Australia, and moved there in the 1970s, by which time her career in the UK had waned (although “The Black and White Rag” was heard regularly as the theme to TV show “Pot black”.) She also had a property in Trinidad where she often stayed . She died in 1983.
  6. Nuits de Paris by Georges Ulmer (released by Columbia (DF 3182) in 1947). Georges Ulmer was born in Denmark in 1919, but grew up in Spain before finding fame in France as a singer and song writer. His most famous song, Pigalle, has been covered by Bing Crosby, Petula Clark, Paul Anka and Jean Sablon, among others. He also appeared in around a dozen films during the ’50s and early ’60s. He died in 1989.
  7. Le barbier de Palermo by Jaques Helian et son Orchestre (released by Pathe (PG 359) in 1950.) Jacques Helian was born in 1912 in Paris. He began his musical career in the early ’30s as a saxophonist for Roland Dorsay’s Orchestra, but after being made a prisoner of war from 1940-1943, he formed his own orchestra. He initially recorded for Columbia, releasing dozens of records for them between 1945 and 1949, before moving to the Pathe label. His Orchestra disbanded in 1957, although Helian performed until the early ’80s. He died in 1986.
  8. The Sunshine of Marseilles by Cavan O’Connor (released by Regal (MR 44) in 1930). Cavan O’Connor was born (as Clarence O’Connor) in Ireland in 1899, but his family moved to England shortly after his birth. He served in the First World War but was injured and demobbed aged 16, and he began his singing career. By the mid ’20s he was appearing in minor roles on stage, in musical theatre and operas, and made his first radio appearance for the BBC in 1925. A couple of years later he began his recording career, first for the Broadcast label, then Regal, Regal Zonophone, Rex and Decca. His records include “Goodnight, Sweetheart” (1931), “My heart is always calling you” (1934), “Shannon River” (1940), and “Little town in the Ould County Down” (1948). He carried on performing until the ’80s, and died in 1997.
  9. Un Refraint Courait dans la rue by Edith Piaf (released by Columbia (4004 F) in 1950.) Edith Piaf was born on 19th December 1915 in Paris. Her father was a street performer of acrobatics, while her mother was a singer in cafes. She was abandoned by her mother soon after birth, and when her father enlisted in the army in 1916 he gave Edith to his mother, who ran a brothel in Normandy. In the late 1920s her father was again working as a street performer and she joined him, and began singing. In 1935 she started singing at Le Gerny’s club off the Champs- Elysees where she was given the nickname La Mome Piaf (The little sparrow). This led to her first recording contract. Over the next decade she became one of the biggest stars in France, and after the war ended in 1945 her fame spread internationally. Piaf had an eventful life, which has been dramatised in several films, most recently and successfully in 2007’s “La Vie en Rose”, named after one of her most famous songs. Piaf carried on working until her death in October 1963 and some of her most famous songs were from relatively late in her career-“Milord” in 1959, and “Non, Je ne regrette Rien” and “Exodus” in 1961.

78Man Podcast No. 18-Around the World Part 2

This podcast sees the conclusion of our trip around the world and can be heard on Itunes here or on Soundcloud here . Tracks heard on this podcast are :

  1.  Johnny, Tu N’es Pas Un Ange by Edith Piaf (Released by Columbia (DCF 140) in 1953) Edith Piaf was born on 19th December 1915 in Paris. Her father was a street performer of acrobatics, while her mother was a singer in cafes. She was abandoned by her mother soon after birth, and when her father enlisted in the army in 1916 he gave Edith to his mother, who ran a brothel in Normandy. In the late 1920s her father was again working as a street performer and she joined him, and began singing. In 1935 she started singing at Le Gerny’s club off the Champs- Elysees where she was given the nickname La Mome Piaf (The little sparrow). This led to her first recording contract. Over the next decade she became one of the biggest stars in France, and after the war ended in 1945 her fame spread internationally. Piaf had an eventful life, which has been dramatised in several films, most recently and successfully in 2007’s “La Vie en Rose”, named after one of her most famous songs. Piaf carried on working until her death in October 1963 and some of her most famous songs were from relatively late in her career-“Milord” in 1959, and “Non, Je ne regrette Rien” and “Exodus” in 1961.
  2. Shanghai by Robert English (Released by Parlophone (E-5360) in 1925) Little is known about Robert English, but he recorded other records such as “Where can I find a pal like Mother?”, “Tell all the world” and “Peggy O’Halloran”. He also recorded as Robert Howe in the 1910s.
  3. Royal Anthem of Roumania by Jumbo Military Band (Released by Jumbo (1449) in 1916.) The Jumbo label ran from 1908 to 1919 and released records by well known artistes such as George Formby (senior), Stanley Kirkby, The Two Filberts and Miss Jessie Broughton. The Jumbo Military band recorded several records for the label including a cover of Irving Berlin’s “Everybody’s doing it” “At a Georgia camp meeting” and “Selection of Pantomime melodies”.
  4. In Old Madrid by Jack Payne and his BBC Dance Orchestra (Released by Columbia (CB 321) in 1931. (see below)
  5. Moscow by Gracie Fields (Released by His Master’s Voice (B 3244) in 1929) Gracie Fields was born 9 January 1898 in Rochdale and christened Grace Stansfield. She made her first stage appearance at the age of 7 and made her first recordings for His Master’s Voice in 1928, recording one of her biggest hits, “Sally” for them in 1931. In 1935 she moved to Rex Records, her first release for the label being “When I grow too old to dream”/”Turn ‘Erbert’s face to the wall, Mother” on Rex 8557. She recorded for both Rex and Regal Zonophone until moving to Decca in 1941. Among her other big hits are “Walter Walter (lead me to the altar”)”, “The biggest aspidistra in the world”, “Wish me luck”, and “Clogs and shawl”. Although often remembered for her comedic songs, she recorded many non comedic romantic and religious songs. During this time, of course, she also appeared in several films, including “Sally in our alley” (1931), “Sing as we go!” (1934), “Look up and laugh” (1935), “Queen of hearts” (1936), and “Shipyard Sally” (1939). Gracie spent most of her later life living on the Isle of Capri where she died on 27th September 1979. Watch Gracie singing “The sweetest song in the world” from the film “We’re going to be rich” Here
  6. Underneath The Russian Moon by The Rhythm Maniacs (Released by Decca (F. 1583) in 1929). Decca Records was founded in early 1929 by Edward Lewis, and he decided the label should have a “house” band, which was The Rhythm Maniacs under the direction of Philip Lewis, and featuring Arthur Lally on saxophone and Sylvester Ahola on Trumpet. They were active for around 3 years,until Philip Lewis’ premature death in 1931; Arthur Lally played with Ambrose’s band and The Savoy Orpheans, as well as recording with his own band The Million-aires. He died in 1940 aged 39. The Rhythm Maniacs other records include “The wedding in the ark”, “When it’s springtime in the Rockies”, “What good am I without you?” and “Keepin’ out of mischief now”.
  7. My Californian Girl by The Elliotts (Released by The Winner (3323) in 1919) The Elliotts released many records for the Winner label in the 1910s and early ’20s, including “Down Home in Tennessee”, “After you’ve gone”, “Pucker up and whistle” and “Last night on the back porch”.
  8. Hunting Tigers Out In Indiah by Jack Payne and his BBC Dance Orchestra (Released by Columbia (CB 151) in 1930) (See Podcast 2 blog for more info on Jack Payne). There’s a great clip of Jack Payne and his band performing “Tiger Rag” in Paris here
  9. Welsh Medley by Savoy Orpheans at the Savoy Hotel, London (Released by Columbia (3403) in 1924.) The Savoy Orpheans were the resident band at The Savoy Hotel in London between 1923 and 1927, and were formed by Debroy Somers (born 1890, died 1952). During this time they released many records, including “Madame Pompadour”, “Say it with a Ukulele”, “What’ll I do” and “Let’s all go to Mary’s house”. When their tenure with the hotel ended at the end of 1927 they disbanded, although in 1931 several ex members, including pianist Carroll Gibbons formed a new band under the name The Savoy Hotel Orpheans. Debroy Somers went on to lead a band using his own name, who recorded many records throughout the ’30s and into the early ’40s.