Tag Archives: Randolph Sutton

New 78Man album : Songs that Leslie Sarony Taught us

Songs that Leslie Sarony taught us is a Various Artists compilation which features 20 tracks written (or co-written) by Leslie Sarony and covered by other artists. Although Sarony recorded his own versions of these songs it was common in the late ’20s and early ’30s for multiple versions of popular songs to be released. Tracks on the album are ;

  1. Why build a wall round a graveyard by Roy Leslie (originally released on Eclipse 620 in 1934).
  2. In these hard times by Leonard Henry (Sterno 993, 1932)
  3. Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead pt 1 & 2 by George Buck and The Roysterers (Edison Bell Winner 5474, 1932)
  4. Jollity Farm by Hal Swain and his band (Regal G 9440, 1929)
  5. Come in Mr Cummin by Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5429, 1929)
  6. I’m a little prarie flower by Billy Cotton and his band (Rex 9180, 1937)
  7. I lift up my finger and I say “tweet tweet” by Gracie Fields (His Master’s Voice B 2999, 1929)
  8. Gorgonzola by The Two Gilberts (Regal MR 198, 1930)
  9. Bunkey doodle I doh by Harry Hudson’s Melody Men (Edison Bell Radio 1300, 1930)
  10. Wheezy Anna by Roy Leslie (Eclipse 374, 1933)
  11. Wheezy Anna’s wedding day by Billy Cotton and his band (Regal Zonophone MR 1141, 1934)
  12. More Rhymes, Pt 1 & 2 by White Star Syncopators (Piccadilly 893, 1931)
  13. Over the garden wall by Albert Whelan (Imperial 2272, 1929)
  14. Shut the gate by The Two Gilberts (MR 180, 1930)
  15. Forty Seven ginger headed sailors by Jack Hylton and his Orchestra (His Master’s Voice B 5542, 1928)
  16. Mucking about the garden by Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5429, 1929)
  17. Topsy Turvy Talk by Albert Whelan (Imperial 2453, 1931)
  18. Let’s all sing the lard song by Harry Bidgood and his broadcasters (Broadcast 185, 1927)
  19. Don’t do that to the poor puss cat by Stanley Kirkby (Edison Bell Radio 862, 1928)
  20. Once aboard the lugger, Pt 1 & 2 by Randolph Sutton (Imperial 2644, 1932)

The album is available on streaming sites such as Spotify and downoad sites such as Itunes .

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78Man Presents Podcast No. 6 – 78Man Favourites

The Sixth Podcast features some of 78Man’s favourite 78s. It can be found on Itunes HERE or on Soundcloud HERE Songs heard are :

  1. Song of the Emmenthaler Valley by The Alpine Yodelling Choir (Released by Regal  (G 9429) in 1929). Yodelling can be traced back to the 16th century and was originally used in the central Alps by herders calling their stock and to communicate between Alpine villages. It became popular as entertainment in music halls and theatres during the 1830s, and peaked in popularity in the late 1920s after Jimmie Rodgers released “Blue Yodel number 1”. Since then there have been several famous yodellers-Bill Haley began his singing career as a yodeller before switching to Rock ‘n’ Roll, while Hank Snow began his career as “The Yodeling Ranger” before becoming a big country music star. Frank Ifield had a huge hit with “She taught me to yodel” in 1962 and “The Sound of Music”, one of the most successful films of the 1960s featured the yodelling song “The Lonely Goatherd”. Despite all this, “Song of the Emmenthaler Valley” appears to be The Alpine Yodelling Choir’s only record and very little is known about them!
  2. Captain Ginjah by Harry Fay Harry Fay began his recording career in 1909 and made many records over the next two and a half decades, mainly as a solo artist but also duets with Florrie Forde and Stanley Kirkby. Among the well known songs he recorded are “It’s a long way to Tipperary”, “Alexander’s Ragtime Band”, “Yes! We have no bananas”, “Bless ’em all”, “Hello! Here comes a jolly sailor”, “Gilbert the Filbert” and “I Do like an egg for my tea”. He also recorded under several pseudonyms, such as Charles Denton and Fred Vernon.
  3. On Her Doorstep Last Night by The Rhythmic Troubadours (with vocal chorus by Tom Barratt) (Released by Regal (G 9455) in 1929). Tom Barratt was active on the recording front from the mid ’20s to the early ’30s and sang with several bands on record-the Jay Wilbur Orchestra, the Nat Starr Orchestra and the Regent Orchestra among others, as well as recording under the pseudonym of Tom Bailey. The Rhythmic Trobadours other recordings included “Ali Baba’s Camel”, “Kiss me goodnight” and “Great Day”.
  4. All By Yourself in the Moonlight by Randolph Sutton (Released by Edison Bell Radio (895) in 1928) Randolph Sutton was born in 1888 in Bristol, and made his stage debut in 1913. He soon became a popular singer but only began recording in earnest in the late 1920s. His other recordings include “All by yourself in the moonlight”, “Oh! Arthur! (What have you done to Martha?)”, “Is Izzy Azzy Woz?”, “Drivin’ the geese to market” and “The sun has got his hat on (He’s coming out today)”. Sutton was a successful stage performer, appearing in many pantomimes and revues, as well as radio and TV appearances (he appeared on BBC TV’s “The Good old days” in 1954.) He continued working until his death, making his final stage appearance on 26th February 1969 in St. Albans, two days before he died. A month later, Radio 2 produced a tribute programme, introduced by George Martin. His influence was such that further tribute programmes were made by Radio 2 in 1980 and 1982.
  5. Banana Oil by Vaughn De Leath (Released by Columbia (3720) in 1925) Vaughn De Leath was born in 1894 in Illinois,USA, as Leonore Vonderlieth, moving to Los Angeles aged 12. She started singing during the 1910s and made her first radio broadcast in 1920 for New York’s 2XG station. The following year she began her recording career and over the next decade made records for Columbia, Brunswick, Okeh, Edison, Victor and others, both under her own name and using pseudonyms such as Sadie Green, Betty Brown and Gertrude Dwyer. Her recordings as Vaughn  De Leath include “Are you lonesome tonight?”, “Under the moon” and “Looking at the world through rose coloured glasses”.  She continued making radio appearances throughout the ’20s and ’30s but her career waned and she died in 1943, having suffered financial problems and alcohol addiction in later years.
  6. Bunkey-Doodle-I-Doh by Hal Swain and his Band (Released by Regal (G 9440) in 1929). Hal Swain was born on May 9th 1894 in Canada. He learned to play saxophone and formed a band which played in Toronto between 1921 and 1924 and was then offered a job in the UK. The band came over and played at the New Prince’s Restaurant in Piccadilly as The New Prince’s Toronto Band, also gaining a recording contract with Columbia, for whom they made records such as “Chick chick chicken”, “Ukulele Baby”, “Follow the swallow” and “Is Zat So?”. This band lasted until 1926, when Hal Swain left and formed Hal Swain’s New Toronto band and continued playing at the New Prince’s until 1928. During this time the BBC broadcast dozens of appearances by the band direct from the restaurant. He then made a series of records for various labels under the name Hal Swain and his band, including “Riding on a camel”, “Saxophobia”, “My baby just cares for me”, “Goodnight, Sweetheart”, and “Tango Lady”. Hal’s recording career dried up during the ’30s but in the late ’30s he teamed up with The Swing Sisters, three female accordion players, and this team lasted until the early ’50s. He died on September 1st 1966. You can see him in 1939 with The Swing sisters Here
  7. Umpa Umpa (Stick It Up Your Jumper) by The Two Leslies (Released by Regal Zonophone (MR 1920) in 1935.) The Two Leslies comprised Leslie Sarony (See Podcast 1 blog) and Leslie Holmes. Holmes, like Sarony, was a singer of novelty songs (and covered many of Sarony’s compositions) although not as prolific or successful. His solo recordings included “I’ve gone and lost my little Yo-Yo”,”The old kitchen kettle”,”Ask me another”(all 1932),”What do you give a nudist on her birthday?”(1934) and “Winter draws on”(1935). The pair joined forces in 1935 and performed as a duo until 1946. The Two Leslies records included “The New Sow”, “The Campbells are coming”, “I’m a little prairie flower” and “So ‘Andsome”.  The phrase “Oompah oompah Stick it up your jumper” was used subsequently by comedian Jimmy Edwards and in several Carry on films, as well as appearing at the end of The Beatles’ song “I am the walrus”.
  8. Pass! Shoot! Goal! By Albert Whelan (Released by Imperial (2404) in 1930) Albert Whelan was born in Melbourne, Australia on 5 May 1875 and had some success in his homeland before emigrating to the UK. He started his recording career in 1905 and made many recordings right up to 1960, his recordings including “Over the garden wall”, “Barnacle Bill the sailor”, “We all go Oo, Ha ha! Together” and “Come and have a cuddle on the common”. He also made many appearances on BBC Radio from 1928 onwards, and during the 1950s introduced a regular programme on the home service called “Mutual Friends” on which he played records. As well as radio and recording work, he also appeared in many films, including “The Man from Chicago” (1930), “The girl in the Taxi” (1937), “Danny Boy” (1941) and “Candlelight in Algeria” (1944). He died on 19th February 1961.
  9. Sweet and Low by The Century Quartette (Released by Columbia (3278) in 1923). The music for “Sweet and Low” was written by Joseph Barnby with lyrics taken from a poem by Alfred Tennyson, in 1865. Barnby was born in 1838 in York, and became a chorister at the age of 7 before moving on to become an organist and conductor. He died in 1896. Tennyson was born in 1809 in Lincolnshire and after attending Grammar School in Louth began studying at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he published his first poems. He was appointed Poet Laureate in 1850, a position he held up until his death in 1892. “Sweet and Low” was recorded on 78 by many artistes, including The Zonophone Glee Party (1911), Big City Four (1919), Mr. Robert Woodville (1921), and The Cloister Bells (1951)

78Man Podcast Number 15-Love

In honour of Valentine’s Day, the February podcast has love as its theme. It can be found on Soundcloud HERE and on Itunes Here . Tracks heard are :

  1. Gosh! I must be falling in love by Leslie Sarony (originally released by Rex Records (8115) in 1934. Leslie Sarony has been on several previous podcasts and you can read more about him in the blog for the first podcast. This song and 39 others are available to stream/download on the 78Man albums “78Man Presents Leslie Sarony” Vols 1 and 2 on itunes, Spotify, etc. You can see the great man himself singing “Peggotty Leg” Here
  2. Under the sweetheart tree by Randolph Sutton (Released by Edison Bell Radio (1426) in 1931.) Randolph Sutton was born in 1888 in Bristol, and made his stage debut in 1913. He soon became a popular singer but only began recording in earnest in the late 1920s. His other recordings include “All by yourself in the moonlight”, “Oh! Arthur! (What have you done to Martha?)”, “Is Izzy Azzy Woz?”, “Drivin’ the geese to market” and “The sun has got his hat on (He’s coming out today)”. Sutton was a successful stage performer, appearing in many pantomimes and revues, as well as radio and TV appearances (he appeared on BBC TV’s “The Good old days” in 1954.) He continued working until his death, making his final stage appearance on 26th February 1969 in St. Albans, two days before he died. A month later, Radio 2 produced a tribute programme, introduced by George Martin. His influence was such that further tribute programmes were made by Radio 2 in 1980 and 1982. You can see him singing “On Mother Kelly’s doorstep” HERE
  3. Love is just like that by Malcolm Desmond (released by Eclipse (155) in 1932). Malcolm Desmond was a pseudonym used by Billy Scott-Coomber when he recorded for the Eclipse label. Other releases include “We’re all going in for hiking”, “Bathing in the sunshine” and “Wagon wheels”. Billy Scott-Coomber was Irish, and first found fame  as the singer in Jack Payne’s band. He made a few records under his own name, such as “June in January” in 1935 and “There’ll always be an England” in 1939. In the 1950’s he was a regular on BBC Radio’s “Children’s Hour”, and was known for his “nursery sing-songs”. In the late ’50s he became a radio producer, (where he was an early champion of Les Dawson), then in the ’60s became the presenter of the radio show “A night at the music hall”. You can see him performing with his singing grenadiers HERE
  4. I’m in love with Susan by Frank Crumit (released by His Master’s Voice (B. 4331) in 1929.) Frank Crumit was born in 1889 in Jackson, Ohio, USA and made his first stage appearance at the age of 5 in a minstrel show. Although he attained a degree in electrical engineering at university, music was his first love and he concentrated on his stage career, first in a group then solo, singing and playing ukulele, appearing on Broadway in 1918 in “Betty be good”. The following year he began recording, some of his earliest recordings being “I’ve Got The Profiteering Blues”, “Good-Bye Dixie Good-Bye”, and “My Little Bimbo Down On The Bamboo Isle” (all released by Columbia in the US in 1920). In 1925 Crumit signed to the Victor label and it was here he recorded some of his best known songs, such as “I’m Sitting On Top Of The World” (1926), “Abdul Abulbul Amir” (1927), “A Gay Caballero” (1928) and “A High Silk Hat And A Walking Cane” (1929). In 1928 Crumit married Julia Sanderson, also a singer, and they started presenting radio shows, including from 1930 onwards, “The battle of the sexes”, which ran until 1943 when Crumit died of a heart attack.
  5. How to make love by Bud Billings (released by Zonophone (5399) in 1929) Bud Billings was the pseudonym of Frank Luther, see Blog for Podcast 9 (Sept 2016) for more info.
  6. You Always Hurt The One You Love by Spike Jones and his City Slickers (released by His Master’s Voice (B.D. 1139) in 1946) More info on Spike Jones can be found in the blog for Podcast 4 (April 2016). Here’s a clip of Spike Jones and his city slickers in action.
  7. Bubbling Over With Love by The Hottentots (released by Eclipse (59) in 1931. The Hottentots were a pseudonym of the Jay Wilbur band (see Podcast 13 blog-January 2017 for more info on Jay Wilbur.) As The Hottentots they recorded several records on Eclipse, including “Sweet Jennie Lee”, “In Geneva with Eva”, “Whistling In The Dark” and “When Yuba Plays The Rumba On The Tuba”. Eclipse Records was run by Woolworths, and provided cheap releases in competition with the major labels. The Woolworths museum site has more information on the label HERE
  8. Do You Love Me by Dick Haymes (released by Brunswick (3726) in 1946) Dick Haymes was born in Argentina in 1918 of British parents, and the family moved to the USA when Dick was a child. After briefly working as a teenage stunt double in films, Haymes began a singing career, becoming the singer for the Harry James Orchestra and in 1942 he replaced Frank Sinatra as the singer in the Tommy Dorsey band. In 1943 he began recording for Decca in the USA (these recordings being released on Brunswick in the UK), releasing songs such as “You’ll never know”, “Put Your Arms Around Me Honey”, and “In Love In Vain”
  9. Falling In Love Again by Al Vocale and his Orchestra (Released by Edison Bell Radio (1389) in 1930.) It would appear that Al Vocale may be a pseudonym for Al Bowlly; this record is mentioned in a couple of Bowlly discographies but details are sketchy. There was at least one other Al Vocale record on Edison Bell Radio, “Say A Little Prayer For Me”/”Waiting For That Thing Called Happiness”.
  10. Goodnight, Sweetheart by Henry Hall and his Gleneagles Hotel Bar Band (Released by Decca (F. 2330) in 1931). Henry Hall was born in London in 1898. He was interested in music from an early age, winning a scholarship to Trinity College of Music, where he studied trumpet, piano, harmony and counterpoint. He formed his own band and began a residency at the Gleneagles Hotel. During the early ’30s Hall’s band became a regular fixture on BBC Radio, broadcasting from Manchester, and in 1932 he took over from Jack Payne as leader of the BBC Dance Orchestra. As well as his radio appearances he made records for Columbia, including “Goodnight Everyone”, “The Man On The Flying Trapeze” and “Red Sails In The Sunset”. During World War 2 Hall entertained the troops both in radio broadcasts and concerts. During the ’50s he carried on broadcasting and playing live, as well as working as an agent and producer. He retired in 1964 and died in 1989.

78Man Favourites Vol 3

78Man Favourites Vol 3 is available now and features another 20 forgotten classics originally released on 78. It’s available at itunes HERE or to stream on Spotify HERE

 

Tracks on the album are :

1. The Music Goes ‘Round and Around-Nat Gonella and his Georgians (Parlophone F 386, 1936)

2. A Fly’s Day Out-Leonard Henry (Sterno 993, 1932)

3. Gertie, The Girl With The Gong-Anona Winn (Rex 8466, 1935)

4. Smile, darn ya, Smile-The Hottentots (Eclipse 105, 1931)

5. The Left Hand Side of Egypt-George Formby (Regal Zonophone MR 3521, 1941)

6. The Fleet’s in Port Again-Billy Cotton (Regal Zonophone MR 2190, 1936)

7. Steamboat Bill-Paul Tremaine (Columbia CB 138, 1930)

8. Henry’s Made A Lady Out Of Lizzie-Jack Hylton and his Orchestra (His Master’s Voice B 5485, 1928)

9. Lost-George Elliott’s Hawaiian Novelty Quartette (Regal Zonophone MR 2108, 1936)

10. You And The Night And The Music-Debroy Somers Band (Columbia FB 1027, 1934)

11. How to make love-Bud Billings (Zonophone 5399, 1929)

12. What can you give a nudist on his birthday-Gracie Fields (His Master’s Voice B 8232, 1934)

13. Oh! Henry What A Lad You Must Have Been!-Randolph Sutton (Decca F 3779, 1933)

14. I’m a Daddy at 63-Charlie Higgins (Rex 8065, 1933)

15. If A Grey Haired Lady Says “How’s Yer Father ?” (That’s Mademoiselle from Armentieres)-Jay Wilbur And His Band (Rex 9691, 1936)

16. John, Give Over Teasing Me-The Spoofums (Eclipse 269, 1932)

17. Rose O’Day-Flanagan and Allen (Decca F 8067, 1942)

18. There’s Another Trumpet Playing In The Sky-Bobbie Comber (Broadcast 896, 1932)

19. Sleepy Rio Grande-Bud and Joe Billings (Zonophone 5465, 1930)

20. Tiptoe Through The Tulips With Me-Sid Garry (Imperial 2218, 1929)

78Man Favourites Vol. 2

78Man Favourites Vol. 2 is the second in an ongoing series of albums featuring restored transfers of 78s, available to download or stream at iTunes HERE or to stream on Spotify HERE

Tracks on this release are :

  1. The Music goes ‘Round and Around-The BBC Dance Orchestra
  2. Shut the door, they’re coming through the window-Roy Fox and his Band
  3. The Girl in the upstairs flat-Joe Loss and his Band
  4. Ali Baba’s Camel Pt. 1 & 2-Cicely Courtneidge
  5. Riding down from Bangor-Frank Crumit
  6. Banana Oil-Vaughn De Leath
  7. Betty Driver Medley Pt. 1 & 2-Betty Driver
  8. The Wibbly wobbly walk-Fred Eliot
  9. Mrs Rush and her scrubbing brush-Randolph Sutton
  10. Bye bye blues-Bert Lown & his Orchestra
  11. The Bum Song-Bud and Joe Billings
  12. Coo! Lovaduck! Crikey! Coo! Blimey!-The Two Leslies
  13. Singin’ in the bathtub-Alfredo & his Band
  14. Knitting-Arthur Askey
  15. Nero-Roy Leslie
  16. On a local train journey-The Commodore Grand Orchestra
  17. The Rain came pitter patter down-Mr Lovejoy, Enoch and Ramsbottom
  18. Potato Pete-Harry Roy and his Band
  19. Whoops! We’re broke again-Syd Roy and his R K Olians
  20. Tip toe through the tulips-Russ Hamilton